COVID-19 pandemic

ongoing pandemic of COVID-19, caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2

The COVID-19 pandemic, also called the coronavirus pandemic, is a current pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).[1][6][b] The outbreak started in Wuhan, Hubei, China, in December 2019. The World Health Organization (WHO) called it a pandemic on 11 March 2020.[7][8][9][10][11] The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses gave the virus its name. As of February 19, 2021, more than 110 million cases of COVID-19 have been reported in more than 188 countries and territories. More than two million people have died of COVID-19,[12] and more than 85 million people have defeated, or recovered from the disease.[12][13][14]

COVID‑19 pandemic
COVID-19 Outbreak World Map per Capita.svg
Confirmed cases per 100,000 population
as of 14 April 2021
  •   >3,000
  •   1,000–3,000
  •   300–1,000
  •   100–300
  •   30–100
  •   0–30
  •   None or no data
Cases per country
COVID-19 Outbreak World Map.svg
Total confirmed cases per country
as of 14 April 2021
  •   1,000,000+
  •   100,000–999,999
  •   10,000–99,999
  •   1,000–9,999
  •   100–999
  •   1–99
  •   None or no data
Deaths per capita
COVID-19 Outbreak World Map Total Deaths per Capita.svg
Confirmed deaths per million population
as of 17 August 2020
  •   100+
  •   10–100
  •   1–10
  •   0.1–1
  •   0–0.1
  •   None or no data
A nurse caring for a patient with COVID‑19 in an intensive care unit
Meeting of the Italian government task force to face the coronavirus outbreak, 23 February 2020
Taiwanese 33rd Chemical Corps spraying disinfectant on a street in Taipei, Taiwan
Burial in Hamadan, Iran
Workers unloading boxes of medical supplies at Villamor Air Base
Clockwise, starting from top:
  • A nurse caring for a COVID‑19 patient in an intensive care unit aboard a U.S. hospital ship
  • Disinfection vehicles in Taiwan
  • Donated medical supplies being received in the Philippines
  • Burial in Iran
  • The Italian government's outbreak task force
DiseaseCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19)
Virus strainSevere acute respiratory syndrome
coronavirus 2
(SARS‑CoV‑2)[a]
SourceProbably bats, possibly via pangolins[2][3]
LocationWorldwide
First outbreakChina[4]
Index caseWuhan, Hubei, China
30°37′11″N 114°15′28″E / 30.61972°N 114.25778°E / 30.61972; 114.25778
Date1 December 2019 (2019-12-01)–present[4]
Confirmed cases135,869,704[5]
Active cases55,649,867[5] (30.2% of total cases)
Recovered77,284,566[5]
Deaths
2,935,271[5]
Territories
192[5]

The virus usually moves from one person to another with small drops made when coughing[15][16] or sneezing.[17] It mostly spreads when people are close to each other, which is why social distancing is encouraged. Coronavirus can also spread when people touch a surface with the virus, and then they touch their face.[16][17] Common symptoms include fever, cough, and trouble breathing.[18] The illness can worsen with pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome.[19] As of January 2021, a number of vaccines for COVID-19 have been developed, but only a few have been approved as safe for use. The first vaccine to be approved was created by Pfizer and BioNTech,[20] followed by the Oxford / AstraZeneca [21] vaccine. Vaccine distribution has begun in many countries in Europe, North America, South America and Asia.[22] The United Kingdom was the first western country to administer a COVID-19 vaccine.[23] No antiviral medicine for COVID-19 is available.[24] Doctors usually give patients supportive therapy instead.[25] People can avoid spreading the virus by regularly washing their hands, covering their mouth when coughing, maintaining distance from other people, staying away from crowds, wearing medical or cloth face coverings, and being alone for people who think they are infected, also known as quarantining.[24]

The outbreak might be from a coronavirus that usually lives in bats. This infected another animal, possibly a pangolin. It then changed inside that other animal until it could infect humans.[26] It originated at a wet market Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market and is linked to China’s wild animal meat trade. Live foxes, crocodiles, wolf pups, giant salamanders, snakes, rats, peacocks, porcupines, koalas and game meats were on the menu at the market.[27] A 55-year-old person from Hubei province was the first human to contract the virus on November 17, 2019.[28] A 61-year-old man who was a regular customer at the market was the first person to die from the virus on January 11, 2020.[29] The exact origin of the virus is still unknown since the market in Wuhan sold a variety of live wild animals in cages. Chinese tourists have spread the virus by traveling to other countries and made it a worldwide pandemic.[30]

Racism and xenophobia against Chinese people and Asians increased during the pandemic.

In November 2020, two companies, Pfizer and Moderna, said they had finished making COVID-19 vaccines. Both are over 90% effective. Two mRNA vaccines, one by Pfizer and one by Moderna, have been tested. Both were over 90% effective.[31] Countries began planning to give the vaccine to many people.[32][33][34]

Video summary (script) on the coronavirus disease (4:12 min)

EpidemiologyEdit

Epidemiology is the study of how diseases affect the health and illness of groups of people.

BackgroundEdit

On 31 December 2019, Chinese health authorities reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) a cluster of viral pneumonia cases of unknown cause in Wuhan,[35][36] and an investigation was launched in early January 2020.[37]

On 9 June 2020, a Harvard University study suggested that COVID-19 may have been spreading in China as early as August 2019, based on hospital car park usage and web search trends.[38]

CasesEdit

Cases means the number of people who have been tested for COVID-19 and have tested positive.[39] These cases are according to Johns Hopkins University.

DeathsEdit

 
Deceased in a 16 m (53 ft) "mobile morgue" outside a hospital in Hackensack, New Jersey

Most people who contract COVID-19 recover. For those who do not, the time between the start of symptoms and death usually ranges from 6 to 41 days, but most of the time about 14 days.[40] This data are recorded by the WHO.

DurationEdit

On 11 March 2020, the WHO said that the pandemic could be controlled.[7]

SymptomsEdit

 
Symptoms of COVID-19. There are reports that even people who do not show symptoms can spread it.[41]

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 makes people feel sick in different ways, but it usually affects the lungs. People usually cough and have difficulty breathing. They often also have a fever, chills, headache, pain in their muscles, or trouble tasting or smelling things,[42] which can often be confused with the flu virus. [43]

According to an April 2020 study by the American Gastroenterological Association, COVID-19 can make sick people vomit or have diarrhea, but this is rare. They said about 7.7% of COVID-19 patients vomited, about 7.8% had diarrhea and about 3.6% had pain in their stomachs.[44]

DataEdit

Location[c] Cases[d] Deaths[e] Recov.[f] Ref.
 
World[g]

135,869,704

2,935,271

77,284,566

[5]

  United States[h] 15,812,789 296,606 7,256,318 [52]
  India 13,873,825 172,085 12,336,036 [53]
  Brazil 6,794,910 179,897 5,931,777 [54][55]
  Russia[i] 2,597,711 45,893 2,059,840 [56]
  France[j] 2,337,966 56,940 174,658 [57][58]
  Italy 1,805,873 63,387 1,052,163 [59]
  United Kingdom[k] 1,787,783 63,082 No data [61]
  Turkey[l] 1,780,673 15,977 458,109 [65]
  Spain[m] 1,730,575 47,624 No data [66]
  Argentina[n] 1,482,199 40,431 1,318,172 [68]
  Colombia 1,399,911 38,484 1,296,420 [69]
  Germany[o] 1,290,859 21,657 941,788 [71][70]
  Mexico 1,217,126 112,326 896,130 [72]
  Poland 1,115,201 22,174 815,356 [73]
  Iran 1,092,407 51,727 787,853 [74]
  Peru 979,111 36,499 914,600 [75][76]
  Ukraine[p] 872,228 14,755 480,348 [77][78]
  South Africa 836,764 22,747 756,671 [79][80]
  Indonesia 1,589,359 43,073 1,438,254 [81]
  Belgium[q] 600,397 17,692 No data [83][84]
  Netherlands[r] 594,523 9,966 No data [86][87]
  Iraq 572,600 12,549 503,897 [88]
  Czech Republic 569,205 9,341 497,828 [89]
  Chile[s] 567,974 15,782 541,345 [93]
  Romania 545,567 13,116 443,168 [94][95]
  Bangladesh 487,849 6,986 414,318 [96][97]
  Philippines 447,039 8,709 409,329 [98][99]
  Canada[t] 445,630 13,207 359,225 [102]
  Pakistan 432,327 8,653 379,092 [103]
  Morocco[u] 391,523 6,492 345,934 [104]
  Switzerland[v] 368,695 5,290 289,800 [105][106]
  Saudi Arabia 359,583 6,023 350,108 [107]
  Israel[w] 352,079 2,959 333,203 [108]
  Portugal 340,287 5,373 263,648 [109][110]
  Sweden 320,098 7,514 No data [111]
  Austria 316,581 4,289 273,503 [112]
  Hungary 265,003 6,451 77,362 [113]
  Serbia[x] 255,758 2,227 No data [114]
  Jordan 255,459 3,286 209,746 [115]
  Nepal 246,694 1,674 232,872 [116]
  Ecuador 200,765 13,858 174,188 [117][118]
  Panama 185,424 3,287 157,888 [119]
  Georgia[y] 183,099 1,694 150,461 [120]
  United Arab Emirates 182,601 607 162,435 [121]
  Bulgaria 174,568 5,405 75,232 [122][123]
  Japan[z] 171,542 2,502 145,014 [124]
  Croatia 168,388 2,484 140,898 [125]
  Azerbaijan[aa] 162,774 1,793 99,892 [126]
  Belarus 156,359 1,246 133,930 [127]
  Dominican Republic 151,721 2,358 118,770 [128]
  Costa Rica 149,815 1,882 109,855 [129]
  Bolivia 146,385 9,008 125,716 [130]
  Kuwait 145,789 910 141,569 [131]
  Armenia 145,240 2,416 121,882 [132]
  Lebanon 143,705 1,182 97,647 [133]
  Qatar 140,680 240 138,194 [134]
  Kazakhstan 137,653 2,096 121,347 [135][136]
  Guatemala 128,541 4,376 117,013 [137]
  Slovakia 127,087 1,122 93,533 [138]
  Oman 125,669 1,463 117,327 [139]
  Moldova[ab] 124,264 2,521 106,471 [140]
  Egypt[ac] 120,147 6,854 104,281 [141]
  Greece 119,720 3,289 No data [142]
  Ethiopia 115,782 1,791 91,209 [143][144]
  Honduras 113,207 2,968 50,948 [145][146]
  Tunisia 106,856 3,717 81,204 [147]
  Myanmar 105,863 2,220 84,338 [148]
  Venezuela 105,852 933 100,952 [149]
  Denmark[ad] 103,564 927 76,927 [150][151]
  Palestine 102,992 890 76,893 [152]
  Bosnia and Herzegovina 99,543 3,250 63,733 [153]
  Slovenia 91,914 1,900 No data [154][155]
  Kenya 90,978 1,582 71,579 [156]
  Paraguay 90,958 1,914 64,527 [157]
  Algeria 90,014 2,554 58,146 [158][159]
  Libya 89,183 1,273 59,222 [160][161]
  Bahrain 88,111 341 86,215 [162]
  Lithuania 86,949 764 36,168 [163][164]
  China[ae] 86,688 4,634 81,762 [165]
  Malaysia 80,309 402 67,173 [166]
  Kyrgyzstan 76,718 1,307 69,341 [167]
  Ireland 75,507 2,120 25,255 [168][169]
  Uzbekistan 74,664 611 71,921 [170]
  North Macedonia 72,044 2,077 48,170 [171]
  Nigeria 71,344 1,190 65,474 [172]
  Puerto Rico 58,629 1,249 No data [173][174]
  Singapore 58,291 29 58,182 [175]
  Ghana 52,738 326 51,518 [176]
  Afghanistan 48,053 1,935 38,099 [177]
  Albania 46,863 977 24,136 [178][179]
  Kosovo 45,594 1,174 32,498 [180]
  South Korea 40,786 572 31,157 [181][182]
  El Salvador 40,741 1,186 37,172 [183]
  Montenegro 40,465 569 29,463 [184]
  Norway[af] 40,023 382 27,414 [187]
  Luxembourg 38,476 369 29,792 [188]
  Sri Lanka 31,375 146 22,831 [189][190]
  Finland[ag] 30,073 433 18,100 [193]
  Australia[ah] 28,012 908 25,465 [194]
  Uganda 25,730 220 9,605 [195][196]
  Cameroon 24,752 443 23,344 [197][198]
  Latvia 23,706 304 1,866 [199]
  Ivory Coast 21,334 132 20,981 [200]
  Sudan 20,468 1,319 11,673 [201][202]
  Zambia 18,091 364 17,307 [203][204]
  Madagascar 17,341 251 16,657 [205]
  Senegal 16,766 343 15,950 [206]
  Estonia 16,956 142 10,533 [207][208]
  Mozambique 16,680 139 14,744 [209]
  Namibia 15,773 158 14,218 [210]
  Angola 15,493 353 8,299 [211]
  French Polynesia 15,411 90 5,167 [212][213]
  DR Congo[ai] 14,169 350 12,208 [214]
  Guinea 13,325 79 12,548 [215][216]
  Maldives 13,308 47 12,621 [217]
  Tajikistan 12,231 86 11,640 [218]
  Cyprus[aj] 12,181 59 2,057 [219][220]
  Jamaica 11,441 270 7,522 [221][222]
  Cape Verde 11,036 106 10,366 [223]
  Malta 10,980 166 8,935 [224][225]
  Zimbabwe 10,912 303 9,062 [226]
  Donetsk PR[ak] 10,829 1,019 5,146 [227]
  Botswana[al] 10,526 36 9,400 [229]
  Mauritania 9,679 194 7,863 [230][231]
  Gabon 9,300 62 9,155 [232]
  Haiti 9,294 233 8,023 [233]
  Cuba[am] 9,181 136 8,212 [234]
  Syria[an] 8,490 452 4,000 [235]
  Uruguay[ao] 8,487 90 5,747 [236][237]
  Bahamas[ap] 7,543 163 5,934 [238][239]
  Hong Kong 7,378 114 5,996 [240]
  Andorra 7,236 78 6,598 [241]
  Guam[aq] 6,889 112 5,846 [52][242]
  Trinidad and Tobago 6,833 122 6,060 [243][244]
  Eswatini 6,685 126 6,279 [245]
  Abkhazia[ar] 6,400 86 4,498 [246]
  Malawi 6,055 186 5,490 [247]
  Rwanda 5,948 49 5,544 [248][249]
  Belize 5,854 148 3,151 [250]
  Guyana 5,811 154 4,925 [251]
  Nicaragua 5,784 159 4,225 [252]
  Congo[as] 5,774 94 4,988 [253][254]
  Djibouti 5,680 61 5,587 [255]
  Iceland 5,539 28 5,323 [256]
  Mali 5,464 181 3,454 [257]
  Suriname 5,337 117 5,218 [258]
  Equatorial Guinea 5,183 85 5,048 [259]
  Aruba 5,031 46 4,879 [260]
  Central African Republic 4,911 63 1,924 [261][262]
  Somalia[at] 4,525 121 3,529 [263]
  Thailand 4,180 60 3,903 [264]
  The Gambia 3,776 123 3,631 [265]
  Curaçao 3,404 8 1,568 [266]
  Togo 3,182 66 2,714 [267]
  South Sudan 3,181 62 2,977 [268][269]
  Benin 3,090 44 2,972 [270][271]
  Burkina Faso 2,635 68 2,426 [272][273]
  Guinea-Bissau 2,444 44 2,337 [274][275]
  Sierra Leone 2,435 74 1,847 [276][277]
  Yemen 2,436 660 1,580 [278]
  Lesotho 2,178 44 1,283 [279][280]
  Niger 2,078 79 1,241 [281]
  South Ossetia[au] 1,904 27 910 [282]
  San Marino 1,800 48 1,438 [283]
  Luhansk PR[ak] 1,770 140 1,541 [284]
  U.S. Virgin Islands 1,733 23 1,544 [285]
  New Zealand 1,704 25 1,607 [286]
  Chad 1,649 101 1,493 [287]
  Jersey 1,637 32 946 [288]
  Liechtenstein 1,466 20 1,296 [289]
  Liberia 1,452 82 1,311 [290]
  Vietnam 1,391 35 1,238 [291]
  Somaliland[av] 1,247 39 1,110 [292][293]
  Sint Maarten 1,201 26 1,058 [294]
  USS Theodore Roosevelt[aq] 1,102 1 751 [295][296]
  Northern Cyprus[aw] 1,095 5 1,015 [297]
  Charles de Gaulle[ax] 1,081 0 0 [298]
  Gibraltar 1,070 5 1,022 [302]
  São Tomé and Príncipe 1,009 17 947 [303]
  Mongolia 905 0 384 [304]
  Turks and Caicos Islands 768 6 740 [305]
  Taiwan[ay] 725 7 595 [307]
  Diamond Princess[z] 712 14 653 [308][309]
  Papua New Guinea 645 7 588 [310]
  Comoros 613 7 590 [311]
  Burundi 589 1 511 [312]
  Monaco 573 3 497 [313]
  Faroe Islands 520 0 503 [314][315]
  Mauritius 505 10 463 [316]
  Eritrea 491 0 438 [317]
  Bhutan 434 0 395 [318]
  Artsakh[az] 404 2 337 [319]
  Isle of Man[ba] 370 25 324 [320]
  Bermuda 364 9 229 [321]
  Cambodia 357 0 307 [322]
  Cayman Islands 298 2 267 [323]
  Barbados 290 7 264 [324]
  Guernsey 289 13 274 [325]
  Saint Lucia 271 3 177 [326]
  Seychelles 183 0 162 [327][328]
  Brunei 150 3 145 [329][330]
  Costa Atlantica 148 0 148 [331][332]
  Antigua and Barbuda 146 4 138 [333][334]
  Bonaire 142 3 138 [335]
  Greg Mortimer[ao] 128 1 No data [336][337]
  Northern Mariana Islands 113 2 32 [338][339]
  Saint Vincent[bb] 91 0 80 [340][341]
  Dominica 91 0 85 [342]
  British Virgin Islands 72 1 70 [343]
  Macau 46 0 46 [344]
  Fiji 44 2 35 [345][346]
  Grenada 41 0 30 [347][348]
  Laos 41 0 33 [349][350]
  New Caledonia 36 0 30 [351]
  East Timor 30 0 30 [352]
  Sahrawi Arab DR[bc] 28 2 26 [353]
  Vatican City 27 0 15 [354][355]
  Saint Kitts and Nevis 25 0 21 [356][357]
  Greenland 19 0 18 [358][359]
  Solomon Islands 17 0 5 [360][361]
  Falkland Islands 17 0 15 [362]
  Saint Pierre and Miquelon 16 0 12 [363][364]
  Sint Eustatius 14 0 4 [365]
  Montserrat 13 1 12 [366]
  MS Zaandam[bd] 13 4 No data [369][370]
  Coral Princess[be] 12 3 No data [372]
  Anguilla 10 0 3 [373]
  SeaDream I[bf] 9 0 No data [374][375]
  HNLMS Dolfijn[bg] 8 0 8 [376][379]
  Saba 5 0 5 [380]
  Marshall Islands 4 0 2 [381][382]
  American Samoa 3 0 0 [383]
  Wallis and Futuna 3 0 1 [384][385]
  Samoa 2 0 0 [386]
  Vanuatu 1 0 1 [387]
  Tanzania[bh] No data No data No data [389][390]
As of 10 April 2021 (UTC) · History of cases · History of deaths
For notes, see the Notes section.

NameEdit

In February 2020, the WHO announced a name for the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2: COVID-19. It replaced the name "2019-nCoV."[391] "Covi" is for "coronavirus," "D" for "disease," and "19" for the year 2019-- the year it was first detected. They said they did not want the name to have any person, place, or animal in it because people might blame the disease on that place, person, or animal. For example, it did not use the word "Wuhan." They also wanted the name to be easy to say out loud.[392]

Mortality rate of COVID-19Edit

 
The current death rate of COVID-19

According to an article in Market Watch dated on February 27, 2020, the overall case mortality rate in China was 2.3%. However, these results might be severely different between different age groups and between men and women. People over the age of 70 experienced a rate of mortality 4-5 times that of the average. Men were more likely to die than women (2.8% versus 1.7% for women) possibly due to lifestyle, such as it being more possible in men to drink and smoke, making the risk of having a respiratory illness more possible, and thus more vulnerable. [393]These numbers were the conclusion of a study by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention using 72,314 COVID-19 cases in mainland China as of Feb. 11. At that point this was the largest sample of cases for such a study.[394]

On March 5, 2020, the WHO released the case fatality rate.[395]

Race and racismEdit

COVID-19 did not affect everyone in each country the same way.[396] As of May 2020, APM Research Lab said the death rate among black Americans was 2.4 times as high as for whites and 2.2 times as high as for Latino and Asian Americans.[397] In July 2020, The New York Times printed data from the Centers for Disease Control showing that black and Latino Americans were three times as likely to become sick and twice as likely to die as white Americans. This was not only in large cities but also in rural areas. This was not only for old people but for people in all age groups. Native Americans were also more likely than whites to become sick and die. Asian Americans were 1.3 times as likely as whites to become sick.[398]

Camara Jones, an epidemiologist who once worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said this was socioeconomic and not because of any natural difference in black and white people's bodies.[399] In the United States, black citizens are more likely to work jobs where they serve the public directly and to ride on public transport rather than take their own cars to work. This makes them more likely to be infected than people who work in private offices or from home. Sharrelle Barber, an epidemiologist and biostatistician from Drexel University, also said black Americans can live in crowded neighborhoods where social distancing is harder to do and healthy food harder to find.[400] Both Barber and Jones blamed the long history of racism in the United States for these things. Three senators, Kamala Harris, Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren said the federal government should start recording the race of COVID-19 patients so scientists could study this problem.[400]

In June, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) told the public that people using the United States' government's Medicare health program had different results depending on race. Four times as many black Medicare patients went to hospitals for COVID-19 than white Medicare patients. There were twice as many hospitalized Hispanic patients than white patients. There were three hospitalized Asian patients for every two hospitalized white patients. The head of CMS, Seema Verma, said this was mostly because of socioeconomic status.[401]

In the United Kingdom, twice as many black COVID-19 patients died as white COVID-19 patients. Other non-white people, like people from India and Bangladesh, were also more likely to die of COVID-19 than whites. Britain's Office of National Statistics said that the differences in money and education explained some of this difference but not all of it. They also said they did not know whether non-white patients caught COVID-19 more often or whether they caught more severe cases. Only female Chinese Britons were less likely to die of COVID-19 than white Britons.[402]

Indigenous peoplesEdit

Native Americans in the United States have shown more deaths from COVID-19 than the rest of the U.S.[403] As of May, the Navajo Nation had 88 deaths and 2,757 cases, and the money they had been promised by the government arrived several weeks late. Only 30% of the people in the Navajo Nation have pipes with running water, which made it difficult for people to wash their hands.[404]

Scientists from Chapman University made a plan to protect the Tsimane people in Bolivia from COVID-19 and said this plan would also work for other indigenous peoples living on their own land. The scientists said that many indigenous peoples have problems that make COVID-19 more dangerous for them, like poverty, less clean water, and other lung diseases. Hospitals may be a long distance away, and racism can affect the way doctors and nurses react. But they also sometimes have things that help, like traditions of making decisions together and the ability to grow food nearby.[403] The scientists found people who spoke the Tsimane language as a first language and made teams to go to Tsimane towns to warn them about COVID-19. They also used radio stations. They said the best plan was for whole communities to decide to isolate. They found this worked well because the Tsimane already usually made their big decisions together as a community in special meetings and already had a tradition of quarantining new mothers. The Chapman scientists said their plan would also work for other indigenous peoples who also make decisions together, like the Tsimane. [405][403] The Waswanipi Cree in Canada, the Mapoon people in Australia, and many groups in South America already tried plans like these on their own.[403][406]

George Floyd protestsEdit

In May 2020, police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota killed an unarmed black man called George Floyd while they were arresting him. There were weeks of protests all over the world against police brutality and racism. Experts said they were worried protesters and police could spread SARS-CoV-2 to each other. Other experts said some of the reasons that the protests were so big was because non-white people were being killed by COVID-19 more than white people were, because poor leadership in the COVID-19 crisis reminded them of poor leadership about racism, and because the lockdowns shut down workplaces and other things. This meant people had more time to protest.[406][407][408][409]

African AmericansEdit

African Americans are more likely to die from the virus.[410]

Conspiracy theoriesEdit

In early 2020, some people began to think that the SARS-CoV-2 may have been made on purpose in a laboratory and either released by accident or on purpose like a weapon. Some Iranians thought the Americans might have made it.[411] Chinese state media said COVID-19 came from the United States to China and not the other way around.[412] Some Americans thought the Chinese might have made it.[413] Some Britons thought it might have been created by accident by 5G cell phone networks.[414]

On March 17, 2020, scientists from Columbia University and other places published a paper in Nature Medicine showing that SARS-CoV-2 was almost surely not made by humans in a laboratory. They did this by comparing the genomes of different viruses to each other.[26] The scientists saw that SARS-CoV-2 did not match any of the viral backbones that already exist for virologists to use.[415] Within a few weeks, it became one of the most cited scientific papers in history, meaning that other scientists were reading and using it.

GraphsEdit

Timelines of COVID-19Edit

 
Map of national and subnational lockdowns as of 29 November 2020 (table; more details)
  Current national lockdown
  Current subnational lockdown
  Former national lockdown
  Former subnational lockdown
  No lockdown or no data

On December 31, 2019, China alerted WHO to several cases of unusual pneumonia in Wuhan, Hubei province. [418]

On January 20, 2020, Chinese premier Li Keqiang called for efforts to stop and control the pneumonia epidemic caused by a novel coronavirus.[419] As of February 5, 2020, 24,588 cases have been confirmed,[420][421] including in every province-level division of China.[420] A larger number of people may have been infected, but not detected (especially mild cases).[422][423] The first local transmission of the virus outside China occurred in Vietnam between family members,[424] while the first local transmission not involving family occurred in Germany, on January 22, when a German man contracted the disease from a Chinese business visitor at a meeting.[425] As of 5 February 2020, 493 deaths have been attributed to the virus since the first confirmed death on January 9, with 990 recoveries.[426][420] The first death outside China was reported in the Philippines, in a 44-year-old Chinese male on February 1.[427] but another source reported: "The first cases of COVID-19 outside of China were identified on January 13 in Thailand and on January 16 in Japan".[428]

There has been testing which have showed over 6000 confirmed cases in China,[429] some of whom are healthcare workers.[430][431]

Confirmed cases have also been reported in Thailand, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Macau, Hong Kong, the United States (Everett, Washington and Chicago),[431] Singapore,[432] Vietnam,[433] France[434] and Nepal.[435]

The World Health Organization declared that this is a Public Health Emergency of International Concern since January 30, 2020.

Bloomberg News and other business publications have reported several plant closures, travel restrictions, and imposed quarantines as a result of this outbreak.[436]

As of February 10, 2020 there have been 40,235 confirmed cases reported of people infected by the virus in China. Also reported were 909 deaths, and 319 cases in 24 other countries, including one death, according to WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.[437]

On November 14, 2020, there were 53,853,718 global COVID-19 cases and 1,311,524 deaths with cases in 217 countries and territories.[438]

ChinaEdit

  • The first cases of COVID-19 were detected in Wuhan, Hubei, Mainland China in December of 2019.[439]
  • On Feb. 4, 2020, the Seattle Times reported that Around 2020 Chinese new year authorities closed down travel from China to Macau. As a result visits fell eighty percent.[440]
  • Feb 6, 2020, the COVID-19 whistleblower, Li Wenliang, dies of the disease.
  • On February 6, 2020, according to Chinese authorities, a man from the United States who tested positive for the virus died.[441]
  • On February 25, 2020 the Asian Scientist Magazine reported Chinese Scientists Sequence Genome Of COVID-19 [442]
  • According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention, China had the largest number of confirmed cases and deaths on March 1, 2020.[443]
  • On March 3, 2020 Science (journal) reported:
    • China built two new hospitals in one week just for patients of COVID-19
    • The article praised the way China has handled this crisis, but said "draconian" measures were used to achieve success.[444]
  • On March 6, 2020, CNN reported that a hotel used as a COVID-19 quarantine center collapsed. Seventy people were trapped in a collapsed Quanzhou hotel.[445]
  • The Chinese economy was greatly affected by the virus, and many factories shut down during the spike of cases in China during the early months of the pandemic.[446]
  • As of October 30, 2020, the number of cases of the virus in China were generally going down, with only 771 new cases being reported in the month of October.[447]

United StatesEdit

  • The first case of COVID-19 in the United States was detected in a man from the state of Washington on January 21, 2020.[448]
  • On February 27, 2020, US President Donald Trump appointed Vice President Mike Pence to lead the US response to COVID-19.[449]
  • On February 29, 2020, the first death in the US was reported from the state of Washington.[450]
  • On March 3, 2020 CBS reported 15 states with confirmed cases.[451]
  • Movements such as elbow bumps began replacing handshakes , as handshakes spread the virus and bacteria more.[452]
  • On March 6, 2020, the CDC announced that one million test kits would be distributed.[453][454]
  • On March 9, 2020, the US stock market was approaching bear territory.[455]
  • On March 9, 2020, there were also scattered reports that some were quarantined while their household members were not.[456]
  • On March 10, 2020, the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services, Alex Azar, said that it is was not known how many Americans tested positive for the virus. This was because many of the test kits went out to private companies.[457]
  • On March 10, 2020, the governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo, announced that the city of New Rochelle was the largest cluster of COVID-19 cases in the state. Among other things done to contain the virus in New Rochelle, the National Guard was sent to the city to hand out food and disinfect buildings.[458]
  • On March 26, the United States surpass Italy and China's cases, becoming the epicenter for a while.[459]
  • On April 3, 2020, the CDC first recommended the use of cloth face coverings by the general public to reduce the spread of the virus in places such as grocery stores and pharmacies.[460]
  • On April 11, the U.S became the most death in the world. [461]
  • On July 22, 2020, the United States surpassed 1,000 daily COVID-19 deaths for a second time.[462]
  • On September 22, 2020, the United States reached 200,000 deaths from the virus.[463]
  • Between September to October, there was a COVID-19 outbreak at the White House, causing many officials to be diagnosed with the infection, including President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump.[464]
  • In December 2020, California surpassed over 30,000 new cases in a day.[465]
  • On December 11, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration said doctors could give people the Pfizer vaccine.[32][34]
  • On December 14, 2020, the State of New York gave people the first vaccines, starting with health care workers.[32][34]
  • On December 26, 2020, California had a record breaking 65,055 new cases in a day after Christmas.[466]
  • California became the first state to surpass 2 million cases in December 2020.[467]

Economic effects of COVID-19 in the United StatesEdit

ItalyEdit

  • On February 27, 2020, according to the EU Observer, a dozen towns in the northern regions of Lombardy and Veneto were under lockdown, with around 50,000 citizens not allowed to leave, and over 200 reported cases of COVID n Italy.[472]
  • On March 4, 2020, according to the Guardian , the Italian government has ordered the closing of all of Italy's schools and universities until 15 March, 2020[473]
  • On March 5, 2020 the Guardian reported: "Italian educational institutions close as Covid-19 deaths pass 100"[474]
  • On March 8, 2020, Al Jazeera reported that after a daily infection rate of 1,247 cases, Lombardy together with ten other areas were sealed off to try to quarantine 16 million people.[475] The cities of Milan and Venice were in the quarantined area. [476]
  • On March 10, 2020, it was reported that Italy was under quarantine.[477][478]
  • On October 5, 2020, Italy imposed a new lockdown and set of restrictions after previously relaxing them. This was due to a second wave of cases that was even worse than the one in spring.[479]

IranEdit

  • On 28 February 2020, the BBC reported COVID-19 deaths in Iran were at least 210.[480]
  • March 3, 2020 multiple Iranian government officials including deputy health minister Iraj Harirchi and vice president of women and family affairs Masoumeh Ebtekar, who served as a spokesperson during the Iran hostage crisis, had contracted COVID-19.[481][482]

CanadaEdit

  • The first case of COVID-19 in Canada was detected in a man from Toronto on January 25, 2020.[483]
  • On March 12, 2020, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the wife of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, tested positive for coronavirus. The Prime Minister and his wife isolated for 14 days.[484]
  • On April 6, 2020, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Theresa Tam, said that people should use simple cloth facemasks to help slow the spread of the virus.[485]
  • On May 1, 2020, Canada surpassed 200 daily coronavirus deaths.[486]
  • On November 12, 2020, Canada surpassed 5,000 daily COVID-19 cases.[486]
  • On December 26, 2020, Canada confirmed first two cases of mutant coronavirus strain from England.[487]

South AfricaEdit

  • The new coronavirus strain, called the 501.V2 Variant, was first discovered in South African province Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape. It spreads more rapidly.[488]

AustraliaEdit

New ZealandEdit

  • The first case of COVID-19 in New Zealand was detected in late February 2020 in a person in their 60s.[490]
  • On March 24, 2020, New Zealand reported over 100 daily coronavirus cases for the first time.[491]
  • From April to November 2020, New Zealand reported between 0 to 50 daily cases.[491]

Cruise shipsEdit

  • On the Diamond Princess cruise ship, out of 3,711 total passengers and crew members, 621 people, or 17% of all the people on board the ship tested positive for COVID-19. The ship ended its quarantine on February 18th.[492]

AfricaEdit

Food and hungerEdit

The pandemic made it more difficult for millions of people all over the world to get enough food. People lost their jobs, so they did not have money to buy food. Farms were shut down, so there was less food made. Processing plants and food factories were shut down, so less food was made ready for people to eat.[494]

In April, Arif Husain of the United Nations' World Food Program said that 130 million more people could go hungry, in addition to the 135 million who were already hungry before the pandemic began. He said that poorer countries would be more affected than rich countries because the way they move raw food from farms to cities and other places where people live is less organized and relies more on human beings than on automatic systems.[494]

This hunger crisis is different from crises in other years because it happened to the whole world at the same time. That meant that people working in other countries could not help by sending money home.[494][495]

All over the world, children who ate meals at school had less access to food when the schools were shut down.[494]

Scientists from the University of Michigan said the pandemic was making it harder for people to find food. In a study published in May, they said out of of seven Americans over age 50 said they had trouble getting enough food before the pandemic, and it got worse when senior centers that provided meals were closed.[496] Federal and state governments started programs to bring food to older people and children. There were also more food donation drives in towns.[495]

Old peopleEdit

In the United States, nursing homes had some of the highest rates of infection and death,

40% of all COVID-19 deaths in the country. Nursing homes are group homes for old people who need medical care, for disabled people who need medical care, and for people recovering from severe sickness or injury, like stroke patients.

Many people who live in nursing homes pay through the government program Medicaid, which pays less than Medicare or regular insurance companies. In June, many American nursing homes were caught throwing their regular patients out so they could make room for COVID-19 patients who could pay them more. Because nursing homes had stopped allowing visitors, it took longer for them to get caught. United States law requires nursing homes to warn patients 30 days before kicking them out, but the nursing homes did not do this.

Some of the nursing homes took the COVID-19 patients because state governments asked them to and they say they sent their elderly residents away because they were worried they would catch COVID-19 from the sick patients.[497]

EnvironmentEdit

Because so many governments told people to stay at home, there was less air pollution than usual for that time of year. Pollution in New York fell by 50% and the use of coal in China fell by 40%.[498] The European Space Agency showed pictures taken from a satellite of China's pollution disappearing during quarantine and coming back when everyone went back to work.[499]

The pandemic and shutdowns made people use less electricity. In the United States, people got less of their electricity from coal power but kept using gas and renewable power like wind and solar power. This was because coal plants are more expensive to run, so power companies used them less.[500]

Pollution from before the pandemic also affected what happened after people became sick. Scientists saw that more people died from COVID-19 in places with large amounts of air pollution. One team of scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg looked at air pollution information from satellites and statistics on COVID-19 deaths in Italy, France, Germany and Spain and saw that places with large amounts of nitrogen dioxide pollution had more people die from COVID-19. Nitrogen dioxide can damage the lungs.[501][502]

The shutdowns and social distancing also affected animals. Human beings started staying at home about the same time in the spring when sea turtles like to come on land to lay their eggs. Turtle scientists in the United States and Thailand both reported more nests than usual on seashores in Florida and Phuket. They say it is because people are not coming to the beach or bringing their dogs to the beach and because there are fewer boats in the water nearby. Scientists also say they see more dugong and dolphins.[503][504][505] With fewer cars driving down roads, salamanders, frogs, and other amphibians were able to cross them for their spring migration. According to citizen scientists from Big Night Maine, a group that watches amphibians, four amphibians made it across the roads alive for every one amphibian killed by cars. Most years, it is only two to one.[506]

Not all ocean mammals did well. According to marine biologists in Florida, manatee deaths in April and May were 20% higher than in 2019. They say this was because many people decided to go boating because other things to do were closed.[507]

Stopping the next pandemicEdit

Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global had the idea for a system that people could use to find dangerous germs before they become pandemics or even before they jump from other animals to humans. They said it was important to watch the wildlife trade, like in the Wuhan wet market. The scientists said that over the past eleven years it has gotten easier and easier to sequence viral genomes, and it does not have to be done by a large lab or by a government any more. The scientists said it would be better to spread the work out among more people.[508][509]

Prevention and treatmentEdit

Avoiding traveling and staying home will greatly reduce your risk from catching COVID-19. Staying home doesn't apply if one is sick and needs medical care. Get enough rest and stay hydrated.[510] Wearing a mask and washing your hands can prevent the virus from spreading.[511] Masks should not be placed on children under 2 years of age, people who have trouble breathing, have a respiratory or other medical condition which renders one unable to wear a mask safely, or anyone who is unable to remove the mask without help. Covering coughs and sneezes also reduce the risk of spreading the virus, but one can infect someone else by touching things with coughed/sneezed-in hands. Making sure not to share drinking glasses, cups and particularly other objects which people will drink or eat out of is important if one assumes they are infected or tested positive in the past. Washing eating utensils and other oral eating objects is preferable and cleaning surfaces or possessions which have been repeatedly touched is also important. These include, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Avoiding touching your face, nose, or mouth with your hands. Avoiding public transportation, taxis or taking rides with others can stop one's exposure to the virus. [510] Rumors spread about high doses of Vitamin C preventing COVID-19, but these as of October 14, 2020, there has been no conclusive evidence to support this idea.[512] However, there has been evidence pointing to the fact that dosing patients with Vitamin C, either through mouth or IV can reduce time on mechanical ventilators for seriously ill patients by 14%.[513]Drinking tea such as black tea and green tea can inhibit the virus.[514] Staying home for the holidays, having a small gathering of close friends and family members who are consistently taking measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and celebrating virtually through social media can prevent being infected by the virus. Airports, bus stations, train stations, public transport, gas stations, and rest stops are all places travelers can be exposed to catching the virus.[515] Eating a healthy diet that is high in fruits and vegetables, getting rest and sleep, exercising, consuming raw honey, probiotics, garlic, mushrooms and elderberry can boost the immune system.[516] Playing video games to pass time during quarantine can prevent the virus from spreading.[517] Flavanols and proanthocyanidins which are chemicals found in dark chocolate, grapes and green tea may block SARS-CoV-2 proteins.[518] Places you are most likely to catch the virus are churches, hair and nail salons, cruise ships, hospitals and the doctor’s office, restaurants and bars, theaters, sporting events, concert venues, buses, restrooms, elevators, the gym, airplanes, hotels, public swimming pools, nightclubs and the beach.[519]

List of terminology associated with COVID-19Edit

  • SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes COVID-19
  • 2019-nCoV is the old name for SARS-CoV-2
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 is the complete name for COVID-19
  • community spread is the spread of the disease without a known travel connection
  • clusters are groups of COVID-19 cases in which many people in the same area became infected with COVID-19
  • lockdown
  • presumptive confirmed positive
  • quarantine
  • sealed off

NotesEdit

  1. In summary, this article is about the coronavirus pandemic, which is caused by the disease COVID‑19, which is caused by the virus SARS‑CoV‑2.[1]
  2. To summarize, this article is about the pandemic, which is caused by the disease COVID-19, which is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2.
  3. Location: Countries, territories, and international conveyances where cases were diagnosed. The nationality of the infected and the origin of infection may vary. For some countries, cases are split into respective territories and noted accordingly.
  4. Cases: This number shows the cumulative number of confirmed human cases reported to date. The actual number of infections and cases is likely to be higher than reported.[45] Reporting criteria and testing capacity vary between locations.
  5. Deaths: Reporting criteria vary between locations.
  6. Recoveries: May not correspond to actual current figures and not all recoveries may be reported. Reporting criteria vary between locations and some countries do not report recoveries.
  7. The worldwide totals for cases, deaths and recoveries are taken from the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center. They are not sums of the figures for the listed countries and territories.
  8. United States
    1. Figures include cases identified on the Grand Princess.
    2. Figures do not include the unincorporated territories of Puerto Rico, Guam, Northern Marian Islands, and U.S Virgin Islands, all of which are listed separately.
    3. Not all states or overseas territories report recovery data.
    4. Cases include clinically diagnosed cases as per CDC guidelines.[46]
    5. Recoveries and deaths include probable deaths and people released from quarantine as per CDC guidelines.[47][48][49]
    6. Figures from the United States Department of Defense are only released on a branch-by branch basis since April 2020, without distinction between domestic and foreign deployment, and cases may be reported to local health authorities.[50]
    7. Cases for the USS Theodore Roosevelt, currently docked at Guam, are reported separate from national figures but included in the Navy's totals.
    8. There is also one case reported from Guantanamo Bay Naval Base not included in any other nation or territory's counts.[51] Since April 2020, the United States Department of Defense has directed all bases, including Guantanamo Bay, to not publish case statistics.[50]
  9. Russia
    1. Including cases from the disputed Crimea and Sevastopol.
    2. Excluding cases from the Diamond Princess cruise ship, which are classified as "on an international conveyance".
  10. France
    1. Including overseas regions of French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte and Réunion, and collectivities of Saint Barthélemy and Saint Martin.
    2. Excluding collectivities of New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon and Wallis and Futuna.
    3. Recoveries only include hospitalized cases.[57]
    4. Figures for total confirmed cases and total deaths include data from both hospital and nursing home (ESMS: établissements sociaux et médico-sociaux).[57]
  11. United Kingdom
    1. Excluding all British Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies.
    2. As of 23 March 2020, the UK government does not publish the number of recoveries. The last update on 22 March reported 135 recovered patients.[60]
  12. Turkey
    1. From 29 July to 24 November 2020, the Ministry of Health did not publish the total number of positive cases. Instead, symptomatic coronavirus cases were shown as "patients".[62][63] However the current number of recoveries does not cover asymptomatic cases as asymptomatic cases are not monitored after 10 days of isolation.[64]
  13. Spain
    1. The figure for cases excludes serology–confirmed cases.
    2. As of 19 May 2020, the Spanish government does not publish the number of recoveries. The last update on 18 May reported 150,376 recovered patients.
  14. Argentina
    1. Excluding confirmed cases on the claimed territory of the Falkland Islands. Since 11 April, the Argentine Ministry of Health includes them in their official reports.[67]
  15. Germany
    1. Not all state authorities count recoveries.[70]
    2. Recoveries include estimations by the Robert Koch Institute.[70][71]
  16. Ukraine
    1. Excluding cases from the disputed Crimea and Sevastopol. Cases in these territories are included in the Russian total.
    2. Excluding cases from the unrecognized Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics.
  17. Belgium
    1. The number of deaths also includes untested cases and cases in retirement homes that presumably died because of COVID-19, whilst most countries only include deaths of tested cases in hospitals.[82]
  18. Netherlands
    1. The Kingdom of the Netherlands consists of a) the Netherlands* [the country as opposed to the kingdom; listed here], which in turn includes the Caribbean Netherlands, that are made up of the special municipalities Bonaire*, Saba* and Sint Eustatius*; b) Aruba*; c) Curaçao*; and d) Sint Maarten*. All regions marked with an asterisk are listed separately.
    2. The Dutch Government agency RIVM, responsible for the constituent country the Netherlands, does not count its number of recoveries.[85]
  19. Chile
    1. Including the special territory of Easter Island.
    2. The Chilean Ministry of Health considered all cases as "recovered" after 14 days since the initial symptoms of the virus, regardless of the health situation of the infected or if succeeding tests indicate the continuing presence of the virus. The only exceptions are casualties, which are not included as recovered.[90]
    3. Deaths include only cases with positive PCR tests and catalogued as a "COVID-19 related death" by the Civil Registry and Identification Service. This number is indicated in the daily reports of the Ministry of Health. A report with the total number of deaths, including suspected cases without PCR test, is released weekly since 20 June 2020.[91] In the latest report (4 December 2020), the total number of deaths is 20,716.[92]
  20. Canada
    1. On 17 July 2020, Quebec, Canada, revised its criteria on recoveries. The Institut national de santé publique claims that "the previous method resulted in 'significant underestimations' of recovered cases."[100] This change resulted in a drop of active cases nationwide, from a total of 27,603 on 16 July to 4,058 on 17 July.[101]
  21. Morocco
    1. Including cases in the disputed Western Sahara territory controlled by Morocco.
    2. Excluding the de facto state of the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic.
  22. Switzerland
    1. Recoveries are estimates by the Tribune de Genève.
  23. Israel
    1. Including cases from the disputed Golan Heights.
    2. Excluding cases from the Occupied Palestinian Territories.
  24. Serbia
    1. Excluding cases from the disputed territory of Kosovo.
  25. Georgia
    1. Excluding the de facto states of Abkhazia and South Ossetia.
  26. 26.0 26.1 Diamond Princess and Japan
    1. The British cruise ship Diamond Princess was in Japanese waters, and the Japanese administration was asked to manage its quarantine, with the passengers having not entered Japan. Therefore, this case is included in neither the Japanese nor British official counts. The World Health Organization classifies the cases as being located "on an international conveyance".
  27. Azerbaijan
    1. Excluding the self-declared state of Artsakh.
  28. Moldova
    1. Including the disputed territory of Transnistria.
  29. Egypt
    1. Includes cases identified on the MS River Anuket.
  30. Denmark
    1. The autonomous territories of the Faroe Islands and Greenland are listed separately.
  31. China
    1. Excluding 200 asymptomatic cases under medical observation as of 10 December 2020.
    2. Asymptomatic cases were not reported before 31 March 2020.
    3. Excluding Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau.
  32. Norway
    1. Estimation of the number of infected:
      • As of 23 March 2020, according to figures from just over 40 per cent of all GPs in Norway, 20,200 patients have been registered with the "corona code" R991. The figure includes both cases where the patient has been diagnosed with coronavirus infection through testing, and where the GP has used the "corona code" after assessing the patient's symptoms against the criteria by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.[185]
      • As of 24 March 2020, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health estimates that between 7,120 and 23,140 Norwegians are infected with the coronavirus.[186]
  33. Finland
    1. Including the autonomous region of the Åland Islands.
    2. The number of recoveries is an estimate based on reported cases which were reported at least two weeks ago and there is no other monitoring data on the course of the disease.[191] The exact number of recoveries is not known, as only a small proportion of patients have been hospitalized.[192]
  34. Australia
    1. Excluding the cases from Diamond Princess cruise ship which are classified as "on an international conveyance". Ten cases, including one fatality recorded by the Australian government.
  35. DR Congo
  36. Cyprus
  37. 37.0 37.1 Donetsk and Luhansk People's Republic
    1. Note that these territories are distinct from the Ukraine-administered regions of the Donetsk and Luhansk Oblasts.
  38. Botswana
    1. 1,521 people who tested positive have been voluntarily repatriated to their respective countries and are not part of the confirmed case count as a result the Government of Botswana does not include the transferred-out cases.[228]
  39. Cuba
    1. Includes cases on the MS Braemar.
    2. Excluding cases from Guantanamo Bay, which is governed by the United States.
  40. Syria
    1. Excluding cases from the disputed Golan Heights.
  41. 41.0 41.1 Greg Mortimer and Uruguay
    1. Although currently anchored off the coast of Uruguay, cases for the Greg Mortimer are currently reported separately. Six have been transferred inland for hospitalization.
  42. Bahamas
    1. Some of these deaths may still be under investigation as stated in the Ministry's press release.
  43. 43.0 43.1 Guam and USS Theodore Roosevelt
    1. Cases for the USS Theodore Roosevelt, currently docked at Guam, are reported separately.
  44. Abkhazia
    1. Cases from this de facto state are not counted by Georgia.
  45. Congo
    1. Also known as the Republic of the Congo and not to be confused with the DR Congo.
  46. Somalia
    1. Excluding the de facto state of Somaliland.
  47. South Ossetia
    1. Cases from this de facto state are not counted by Georgia.
  48. Somaliland
    1. Cases from this de facto state are not counted by Somalia.
  49. Northern Cyprus
    1. Cases from this de facto state are not counted by Cyprus.
  50. Charles de Gaulle
    1. Including cases on the escort frigate Chevalier Paul.
    2. Florence Parly, Minister of the Armed Forces, reported to the National Assembly's National Defense and Armed Forces Committee [fr] that 2010 sailors of the carrier battle group led by Charles de Gaulle had been tested, with 1081 tests returning positive so far.[298] Many of these cases were aboard Charles de Gaulle, some of the cases were reportedly aboard French frigate Chevalier Paul, and it is unclear if any other ships in the battle group had cases on board.[299][300][301]
  51. Taiwan
    1. Including cases from the ROCS Pan Shi.[306]
  52. Artsakh
    1. Cases from this de facto state are not counted by Azerbaijan.
  53. Isle of Man
    1. Recoveries are presumed. Defined as "An individual testing positive for coronavirus who completes the 14 day self-isolation period from the onset of symptoms who is at home on day 15, or an individual who is discharged from hospital following more severe symptoms."[320]
  54. Saint Vincent
    1. The sovereign state of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.
  55. Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic
    1. Cases from this de facto state are not counted by Morocco.
  56. MS Zaandam
    1. Including cases from MS Rotterdam.
    2. The MS Rotterdam rendezvoused with the Zaandam on 26 March off the coast of Panama City to provide support and evacuate healthy passengers. Both have since docked in Florida.[367][368]
    3. MS Zaandam and Rotterdam's numbers are currently not counted in any national figures.
  57. Coral Princess
    1. The cruise ship Coral Princess has tested positive cases since early April 2020 and has since docked in Miami.[371]
    2. Coral Princess's numbers are currently not counted in any national figures.
  58. SeaDream I
    1. SeaDream I's numbers are currently not counted in any national figures.
  59. HNLMS Dolfijn
    1. All 8 cases currently associated with Dolfijn were reported while the submarine was at sea in the waters between Scotland and the Netherlands.[376]
    2. It is unclear whether the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) is including these cases in their total count, but neither their daily update details nor their daily epidemiological situation reports appear to have mentioned the ship, with a breakdown of cases listing the twelve provinces of the country of the Netherlands (as opposed to the kingdom) accounting for all the cases in the total count.[377][378]
  60. Tanzania
    1. Figures for Tanzania are "No data" as the country stopped publishing figures on coronavirus cases on 29 April.[388] Figures as of that date were 509 cases, 21 deaths, and 183 recoveries.[389][390]

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