Anne, Queen of Great Britain

Queen of Britain and Ireland from 1702 to 1714

Anne of Great Britain (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) was the Queen of England (which included Wales), Scotland and Ireland. During her reign, the kingdoms of England and Scotland came together to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain (the first form of the United Kingdom).[1] For this reason, she is the first monarch to rule over the UK.

Anne of Great Britain
Reign8 March 1702 – 1 August 1714
Coronation23 April 1702
PredecessorWilliam III & II
SuccessorGeorge I
Born(1665-02-06)6 February 1665
St James's Palace, London
Died1 August 1714(1714-08-01) (aged 49)
Kensington Palace, London
Burial
SpousePrince George of Denmark
IssuePrince William, Duke of Gloucester
HouseHouse of Stuart
FatherJames II of England
MotherLady Anne Hyde

Becoming Queen change

Anne was born during the reign of her uncle, King Charles II. After Charles' death, Anne's father James II became King of England. James was unpopular because he was Catholic. James was replaced by Anne's older sister, Mary II and her husband William III. Mary and William had no children. Anne became Queen of of England, Scotland, and Ireland on 8 March 1702 after the death of William.

Kingdom of Great Britain change

In her first speech to the Parliament of England, Anne said it was important to united England and Scotland. In 1707, they both formed to create the Kingdom of Great Britain.[1]

Personal life change

Anne was married to Prince George of Denmark, who died in 1708. Anne was pregnant 17 times but none of her children survived to adulthood. In her 30s, she became very ill and obese.

Death change

Queen Anne died on 1 August 1714. Doctors say she died because of stress and overall poor health. Because of the Act of Settlement and the fact that Anne had no surviving children, the next King of Britain was George I, her cousin.

References change

  1. 1.0 1.1 Murdoch, Alexander (2007). "England, Scotland, and the Acts of Union (1707)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/96282. ISBN 978-0-19-861412-8. Retrieved 2021-06-17. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)