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Ethane is an organic chemical compound with chemical formula C2H6.

Ethane
Skeletal formula of ethane with all implicit hydrogens shown
Skeletal formula of ethane with all implicit carbons shown, and all explicit hydrogens added
Ball and stick model of ethane
Spacefill model of ethane
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Ethane[1]
Systematic IUPAC name
Dicarbane (never recommended[1])
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
Beilstein Reference 1730716
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.741
EC Number 200-814-8
Gmelin Reference 212
MeSH {{{value}}}
PubChem {{{value}}}
RTECS number KH3800000
UNII
UN number 1035
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C2H6
Molar mass 30.07 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless gas
Odor Odorless
Density
  • 1.3562 kg/m−3 (gas at 0 °C)[2]

544.0 kg/m−3 (liquid at -88,5 °C)
206 kg/m−3 (at critical point 305.322 K)

Melting point −182.8 °C; −296.9 °F; 90.4 K
Boiling point −88.5 °C; −127.4 °F; 184.6 K
56.8 mg L−1[3]
Vapor pressure 3.8453 MPa (at 21.1 °C)
kH 19 nmol Pa−1 kg−1
Acidity (pKa) 50
Basicity (pKb) -36
Conjugate acid Ethanium
-37.37·10−6 cm3/mol
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−84 kJ mol−1
Std enthalpy of
combustion
ΔcHo298
−1561.0–−1560.4 kJ mol−1
Specific heat capacity, C 52.49 J K−1 mol−1
Hazards
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

4
1
0
 
Explosive limits 2.9–13%
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

At standard temperature and pressure, ethane is a colourless, odorless gas. It is isolated from natural gas, and as a byproduct of petroleum refining.

Its main use is in the chemical industry, to make ethylene by steam cracking.

At room temperature, the gas is flammable, and it explodes when mixed with air. When ethane is liquid, touching it causes a very serious frostbite.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 4. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4. Similarly, the retained names ‘ethane’, ‘propane’, and ‘butane’ were never replaced by systematic names ‘dicarbane’, ‘tricarbane’, and ‘tetracarbane’ as recommended for analogues of silane, ‘disilane’; phosphane, ‘triphosphane’; and sulfane, ‘tetrasulfane’.
  2. "Ethane – Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 16 September 2004. Retrieved 7 December 2011.
  3. Lide, D. R., ed. (2005). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (86th ed.). Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press. p. 8.88. ISBN 0-8493-0486-5.