Gaia (mythology)

Greek primordial deity, goddess of Earth

Gaia (Ancient Greek: Γαῖα), also spelled Gaea, is the personification of the Earth in Greek mythology. She was a primordial being, one of the first to have sprung forth from the void of Chaos. She is the mother and wife of Ouranos (Father Sky), with whom she sired the Titans, the Hekatonkheires, and the Elder Cyclopes. Other children of Gaia include Pontus (the sea), and the storm giant Typhon. Her Roman equivalent is Terra.

Gaia
Member of the Protogenoi
Feuerbach Gaea.jpg
Gaea, by Anselm Feuerbach (1875)
AbodeEarth
Personal information
ConsortUranus, Pontus, Aether and Tartarus
OffspringUranus, Pontus, the Ourea, Hecatonchires, Cyclopes, Titans, The Gigantes, Nereus, Thaumus, Phorcys, Ceto, Eurybia, Aergia, Typhon, and Python
ParentsNone, or Chaos (Hesiod), or Aether and Hemera (Hyginus)
SiblingsNone, or Nyx, Erebus, Tartarus, Eros, or Uranus, Thalassa
Roman equivalentTerra, Tellus

Family treeEdit

Gaia is the goddess of the Earth and these are her offspring as related in various myths. Some are related consistently, some are mentioned only in minor variants of myths, and others are related in variants that are considered to reflect a confusion of the subject or association.

Related pagesEdit