President of Argentina

head of state and government of Argentina

The President of the Argentine Nation, usually known as the President of Argentina, is the head of state of Argentina. The President is also Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces.

President of the Argentine Nation
Standard of the President of Argentina Afloat.svg
Presidential Standard
Alberto Fernández 2019 (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Alberto Fernández

since December 10, 2019
StyleExcelentísimo Señor (m) Excelentísima Señora (f)
ResidenceCasa Rosada
Quinta de Olivos
Chapadmalal Residence (Summer House)
Term lengthFour years, renewable once
Inaugural holderBernardino Rivadavia
Formationfirst: 1826 Constitution
current: 1853 Constitution, (amended in 1994).
WebsiteOffice of the President

The current President is Alberto Fernández. He was sworn in on 10 December 2019.

List of presidents (since 1861)Edit

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Presidential Period Term of office Elections Political
party
(Coalition)
Notes Vice President R.
Start End
  Bartolomé Mitre
(1821–1906)
Abolition of the Central Government
(Battle of Pavón)
12 December 1861 12 April 1862 Liberal Governor of Buenos Aires Province de facto in charge of the national government after the Battle of Pavón and the resignation of Juan Esteban Pedernera. During the following months, the provinces gave Mitre different powers.[note 1] Vacant [1]
12 April 1862 2 June 1862 Appointed himself by decree as "Governor of Buenos Aires Province in charge of the National Executive Power". [2]
2 June 1862 12 October 1862 The National Congress appointed the Governor of Buenos Aires as the person in charge of the National Executive Power until elections were held. [3]
1862 - 1868 12 October 1862 12 October 1868 1862 Liberal
Nacionalist
Indirect elections with Mitre as the only candidate. First president of the unified country. Waged the War of the Triple Alliance. Marcos Paz
(Died 2 January 1868)
[4]
Vacant
  Domingo Faustino Sarmiento
(1811–1888)
1868 - 1874 12 October 1868 12 October 1874 1868 Indirect elections. Ended the War of the Triple Alliance. Adolfo Alsina [4]
  Nicolás Avellaneda
(1837–1885)
1874 - 1880 12 October 1874 12 October 1880 1874 PAN Indirect elections. Federalization of Buenos Aires City in September 1880. Mariano Acosta [4]
  Julio Argentino Roca
(1843–1914)
1880 - 1886 12 October 1880 12 October 1886 1880 PAN Indirect elections. First term. End of the Argentine Civil Wars. Francisco Bernabé Madero [5]
  Miguel Ángel Juárez Celman
(1844–1909)
1886 - 1892 12 October 1886 6 August 1890 1886 PAN Indirect elections. Resigned following the Revolution of the Park. Carlos Pellegrini [6]
  Carlos Pellegrini
(1846–1906)
6 August 1890 12 October 1892 Vice President under Juárez Celman, assumed the presidency after his resignation. Finished the presidential period 1886–1892. Vacant [6]
  Luis Sáenz Peña
(1822–1907)
1892 - 1898 12 October 1892 22 January 1895 1892 PAN Indirect elections. Government victory in the Revolution of 1893. Resigned. José Evaristo Uriburu [7]
  José Evaristo Uriburu
(1831–1914)
22 January 1895 12 October 1898 Vice President under Sáenz Peña, assumed the presidency after his resignation. Finished the presidential period 1892–1898. Vacant [7]
  Julio Argentino Roca
(1843–1914)
1898 - 1904 12 October 1898 12 October 1904 1898 PAN Indirect elections. Second term. Norberto Quirno Costa [8]
  Manuel Quintana
(1835–1906)
1904 - 1910 12 October 1904 12 March 1906 1904 PAN Indirect elections. Government victory in the Revolution of 1905. Died in office. José Figueroa Alcorta [9]
  José Figueroa Alcorta
(1860–1931)
12 March 1906 12 October 1910 Vice President under Quintana, assumed the presidency after his death. Finished the presidential period 1904–1910. Vacant [9]
  Roque Sáenz Peña
(1851–1914)
1910 - 1916 12 October 1910 9 August 1914 1910 PAN
Modernist
Indirect elections. Promoted the Sáenz Peña law, which allowed secret, universal and mandatory suffrage. Died in office. Victorino de la Plaza [10]
  Victorino de la Plaza
(1840–1919)
9 August 1914 12 October 1916 Vice President under Sáenz Peña, assumed the presidency after his death. Finished the presidential period 1910–1916. Vacant [10]
  Hipólito Yrigoyen
(1852–1933)
1916 - 1922 12 October 1916 12 October 1922 1916 UCR Free indirect elections. First president elected under the Sáenz Peña law. First term. Maintained neutrality during World War I. Pelagio Luna
(Died 25 June 1919)
[11]
Vacant
  Marcelo Torcuato de Alvear
(1868–1942)
1922 - 1928 12 October 1922 12 October 1928 1922 UCR Free indirect elections. Elpidio González [11]
  Hipólito Yrigoyen
(1852–1933)
1928 - 1934 12 October 1928 6 September 1930 1928 UCR Free indirect elections. Second term, ousted from office by a coup d'état. Enrique Martínez [12]
  José Félix Uriburu
(1868–1932)
Revolution of '30

1930 - 1932

6 September 1930 20 February 1932 Military First coup d'état in modern Argentine history. Beginning of the Infamous Decade. Called for elections. Enrique Santamarina
(Resigned 20 October 1930)
[13]
Vacant
  Agustín Pedro Justo
(1876–1943)
1932 - 1938 20 February 1932 20 February 1938 1931 UCR-A
(Concordancia)
Indirect elections held with fraud and with the UCR barred from elections. Julio Argentino Pascual Roca [14]
  Roberto Marcelino Ortiz
(1886–1942)
1938 - 1944 20 February 1938 27 June 1942 1937 UCR-A
(Concordancia)
Indirect elections held with fraud. Resigned for health reasons, died one month later. Ramón Castillo [15]
  Ramón Castillo
(1873–1944)
3 July 1940 27 June 1942 PDN
(Concordancia)
Vice President under Ortiz. Acting president during his illness. Himself
27 June 1942 4 June 1943 Vice President under Ortiz, assumed the presidency after his resignation. Deposed in a coup d'état. End of the Infamous Decade. Vacant
  Arturo Rawson
(1885–1952)
Revolution of '43

1943 - 1946

4 June 1943 7 June 1943 Military Coup d'état. Beginning of the Revolution of '43. Ousted from office. [16]
  Pedro Pablo Ramírez
(1884–1962)
7 June 1943 9 March 1944 Coup d'état. On 25 February 1944, Ramírez temporarily delegated powers to Edelmiro Farrell. Resigned. Sabá Sueyro
(Died 15 October 1943)
Edelmiro Julián Farrell
  Edelmiro Julián Farrell
(1887–1980)
25 February 1944 9 March 1944 Vice President under Ramírez. Acting president. Himself
9 March 1944 4 June 1946 Declared war on the Axis powers. Called for elections. End of the Revolution of '43. Vacant
Juan Perón
(8 July 1944–10 October 1945)
Juan Pistarini
  Juan Perón
(1895–1974)
1946 - 1952 4 June 1946 4 June 1952 1946 Labour
(UCR-JR)
(Independent)
Free indirect elections. First term. Reelection enabled by the Constitution of 1949. Hortensio Quijano
(Died 3 April 1952)
[17]
Vacant
1952 - 1958 4 June 1952 19 September 1955 1951 Peronist Free direct elections. Second term. First election to allow women's suffrage. Victory with 62.49% of votes, highest victory in Argentine elections. Ousted from office by a coup d'état.
Alberto Teisaire
(7 May 1954–16 September 1955)
Vacant
  Eduardo Lonardi
(1896–1956)
Liberating Revolution

1955 - 1958

20 September 1955 23 September 1955 Military Coup d'état. Beginning of the Revolución Libertadora. By decree appointed himself as "Provisional President of the Nation". [18]
23 September 1955 13 November 1955 Lonardi is sworn in as President. Ousted from office. Isaac Rojas
  Pedro Eugenio Aramburu
(1903–1970)
13 November 1955 1 May 1958 Coup d'état. The 1949 Constitution is repealed and the 1853 Constitution is restored. End of the Revolución Libertadora. Called for elections with Peronism barred from elections. [18]
  Arturo Frondizi
(1908–1995)
1958 - 1964 1 May 1958 29 March 1962 1958 UCR Indirect elections with Peronism barred from elections. Ousted from office by a coup d'état. Alejandro Gómez
(Resigned 18 November 1958)
[19]
Vacant
  José María Guido
(1910–1975)
29 March 1962 12 October 1963 Provisional President of the Senate exercising the Executive Power, as the civil procedures to replace the deposed president were followed and Vice President Alejandro Gómez had resigned in 1958. [20]
[19]
  Arturo Umberto Illia
(1900–1983)
1963 - 1969 12 October 1963 28 June 1966 1963 UCR Indirect elections with Peronism barred from elections. Ousted from office by a coup d'état. Carlos Humberto Perette [21]
  Junta of Commanders of the Armed Forces Argentine Revolution

1966 - 1973

28 June 1966 29 June 1966 Military
Coup d'état Beginning of the Argentine Revolution.
Members of the Junta:
Vacant
  Juan Carlos Onganía
(1914–1995)
29 June 1966 8 June 1970 Coup d'état. Ousted from office. [21]
  Junta of Commanders of the Armed Forces 8 June 1970 18 June 1970
Coup d'état. Members of the Junta:
  Roberto M. Levingston
(1920–2015)
18 June 1970 23 March 1971 Appointed by the Military Junta. Ousted from office. [21]
  Junta of Commanders of the Armed Forces 23 March 1971 26 March 1971
Coup d'état Members of the Junta:
  Alejandro Agustín Lanusse
(1918–1996)
26 March 1971 25 May 1973 Appointed by the Military Junta. End of the Argentine Revolution. Called for elections. Peronism ban lifted.
  Héctor José Cámpora
(1909–1980)
1973 - 1977 25 May 1973 13 July 1973 March
1973
PJ
(FREJULI)
Free direct elections. Because no candidate was able to get 50% of the votes needed to win, a runoff should have taken place between Cámpora and Ricardo Balbín, but Balbín decided to withdraw his candidacy, making Cámpora president. First Peronist president after the ban. Cámpora annulled the ban that remained specifically over Juan Perón, and resigned along with his Vice President. Vicente Solano Lima [22]
  Raúl Alberto Lastiri
(1915–1978)
13 July 1973 12 October 1973 President of the Chamber of Deputies exercising the Executive Power. Alejandro Díaz Bialet, President of the Senate and ahead of Lastiri in the succession line, was on a diplomatic mission in Africa at that time. Vacant [23]
[22]
  Juan Perón
(1895–1974)
12 October 1973 1 July 1974 Sept.
1973
Free direct elections. Third term. Died in office. Isabel Perón [22]
  Isabel Perón
(1931–)
29 June 1974 1 July 1974 First Lady and Vice President under Juan Perón. Acting president during his illness. Herself [24]
1 July 1974 24 March 1976 Vice President of Juan Perón, assumed the presidency after his death. First female president in the Americas. Ousted from office by a coup d'état. Vacant
  Military Junta National Reorganization Process

1976 - 1983

24 March 1976 29 March 1976 Military
  Jorge Rafael Videla
(1925–2013)
29 March 1976 29 March 1981 Coup d'état. President of the Military Junta. Longest government of a de facto ruler. [25]
  Roberto Eduardo Viola
(1924–1994)
29 March 1981 11 December 1981 Appointed by Videla as President of the Military Junta. Powers and duties suspended on 21 November 1981 due to health problems. Ousted from office. [25]
  Horacio Tomás Liendo
(1924–2007)
21 November 1981 11 December 1981 Appointed by the Military Junta. Acting president during Viola suspension.
  Carlos Lacoste
(1929–2004)
11 December 1981 22 December 1981 Appointed by the Military Junta. Interim.
  Leopoldo Galtieri
(1926–2003)
22 December 1981 18 June 1982 Appointed by the Military Junta. Waged the Falklands War. Ousted from office. [25]
  Alfredo Oscar Saint Jean
(1926–1987)
18 June 1982 1 July 1982 Appointed by the Military Junta. Interim.
  Reynaldo Bignone
(1928–2018)
1 July 1982 10 December 1983 Appointed by the Military Junta. End of the National Reorganization Process. Called for elections. [25]
  (Presidency)
Raúl Alfonsín
(1927–2009)
1983 - 1989 10 December 1983 8 July 1989 1983 UCR Free indirect elections. The 1989 presidential elections were anticipated. Resigned during the transition and gave power to Carlos Menem six months in advance. Víctor Hipólito Martínez [26]
  (Presidency)
Carlos Menem
(1930–2021)
1989 - 1995 8 July 1989 8 July 1995 1989 PJ
(FREJUPO)
Free indirect elections. First term. The 1994 amendment reduced the presidential term from 6 to 4 years and allowed a single consecutive reelection. Eduardo Duhalde
(Resigned 10 December 1991)
[27]
Vacant
1995 - 1999 8 July 1995 10 December 1999 1995 PJ Free direct elections. Second term. His term was extended to 10 December 1999 according to the Tenth Temporary Provision of the Constitution of 1994. Carlos Ruckauf
  (Presidency)
Fernando de la Rúa
(1937–2019)
1999 - 2003 10 December 1999 20 December 2001 1999 UCR
(Alianza)
Free direct elections. Faced a severe economic crisis. Resigned after the December 2001 riots. Because his Vice President Carlos Álvarez had resigned in October 2000, the Congress Assembled selected a new President. Carlos Álvarez
(Resigned 6 October 2000)
[28]
Vacant
  Ramón Puerta
(1951–)
20 December 2001 22 December 2001 PJ Provisional President of the Senate exercising the Executive Power. [29]
  Adolfo Rodríguez Saá
(1947–)
22 December 2001 30 December 2001 Elected by the Congress for three months, with instructions to call for elections. Resigned. [30]
  Eduardo Camaño
(1946–)
30 December 2001 2 January 2002 President of the Chamber of Deputies exercising the Executive Power. [31]
  Eduardo Duhalde
(1941–)
2 January 2002 25 May 2003 Elected by the Congress, with instructions to complete De la Rúa's term. Called early elections for 27 April 2003. [30]
  (Presidency)
Néstor Kirchner
(1950–2010)
2003 - 2007 25 May 2003 10 December 2007 2003 PJ
(FPV)
Free direct elections. Initially completed the remaining months of De la Rúa's term until 10 December 2003 then began his own mandate. Kirchner finished second to Carlos Menem in the first round and because no one was able to get 45% of the votes needed to win, a runoff should have taken place, but Menem decided to withdraw his candidacy, making Kirchner president. Daniel Scioli [32]
  (Presidency)
Cristina Fernández de Kirchner
(1953–)
2007 - 2011 10 December 2007 10 December 2011 2007 PJ
(FPV)
Free direct elections. First term. First female president of Argentina elected as head of the list. Julio Cobos [33]
2011 - 2015 10 December 2011 10 December 2015 2011 Free direct elections. Second term. By judicial ruling, her mandate ended 9 December 2015 at midnight. Amado Boudou [34]
  Federico Pinedo
(1955–)
2015 - 2019 10 December 2015 PRO
(Cambiemos)
Provisional President of the Senate exercising the Executive Power. Acting president from 00:00 hs. until Macri's swearing in at 11:45 hs. Vacant [34]
  (Presidency)
Mauricio Macri
(1959–)
10 December 2015 10 December 2019 2015 PRO
(Cambiemos)
Free direct elections. First president elected in a ballotage, defeating Daniel Scioli. Although his mandate begun on 10 December 2015 at 00:00 hs., it was only after he swore in the Congress at 11:45 hs. that he took office as President. Gabriela Michetti [34]
  (Presidency)
Alberto Fernández
(1959–)
2019 - 2023 10 December 2019 Incumbent 2019 PJ
(FdT)
Free direct elections. Cristina Fernández de Kirchner

Living former presidentsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Diario de Sesiones de la Cámara de Diputados del Año 1862. Tomo Primero. Buenos Aires: La Tribuna. 1863. p. 43.
  2. Armagnague, Juan Fernando (1986). Historia del derecho: presidencias de Mitre, Sarmiento y Avellaneda. Mendoza: Ediciones Jurídicas Cuyo S.R.L. p. 17. ISBN 950-9099-09-0.
  3. Diario de Sesiones de la Cámara de Diputados del Año 1862. Tomo Primero. Buenos Aires: La Tribuna. 1863. p. 59.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Mendelevich, p.46-52
  5. Mendelevich, p. 53-56
  6. 6.0 6.1 Mendelevich, p. 57-65
  7. 7.0 7.1 Mendelevich, p. 66-72
  8. Mendelevich, p. 73-79
  9. 9.0 9.1 Mendelevich, p. 80-88
  10. 10.0 10.1 Mendelevich, p. 89-101
  11. 11.0 11.1 Mendelevich, p. 102-112
  12. Mendelevich, p. 113-125
  13. Mendelevich, p. 126-129
  14. Mendelevich, p. 130-135
  15. Mendelevich, p. 136–155
  16. Mendelevich, p. 145
  17. Mendelevich, p. 156-176
  18. 18.0 18.1 Mendelevich, p. 177-186
  19. 19.0 19.1 Mendelevich, p. 187-195
  20. Mendelevich, p. 193
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 Mendelevich, p. 196-214
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 Mendelevich, p. 215-228
  23. Mendelevich, p. 223
  24. Mendelevich, p. 229-235
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 Mendelevich, p. 236-241
  26. Mendelevich, p. 242-245
  27. Mendelevich, p. 247-252
  28. Mendelevich, p. 253-262
  29. "La crisis política y económica. Renunció De la Rúa: el peronista Puerta está a cargo del Poder Ejecutivo". La Nación. 21 December 2001.
  30. 30.0 30.1 Mendelevich, p. 263-277
  31. "La crisis institucional. Eduardo Camaño asumió como presidente interino". La Nación. 31 December 2001.
  32. Mendelevich, p. 278-282
  33. Mendelevich, p. 283-292
  34. 34.0 34.1 34.2 "La jueza Servini declaró que el mandato de Mauricio Macri comienza a las 0 horas del día 10 de diciembre". Agencia de Noticias del Poder Judicial. 9 December 2015.

NotesEdit

  1. Catamarca, Córdoba, Mendoza, Santa Fe, Salta, Santiago del Estero and Tucumán accept Mitre as the person in charge of the National Executive Power. Buenos Aires, San Juan and Jujuy only gave Mitre the authority to manage international relations, to convene the National Congress, and to rule on urgent internal business. Corrientes, La Rioja and San Luis only gave Mitre the authority to manage international relations and to convene the National Congress. Entre Ríos only gave Mitre the authority to convene the National Congress.