Republic of Genoa

a medieval and early modern maritime republic from the years 1005 to 1797

The Republic of Genoa (Ligurian: Repúbrica de Zêna [ɾeˈpybɾika de ˈzeːna]; Italian: Repubblica di Genova; Latin: Res Publica Ianuensis) was a medieval republic from the 11th century to 1797 in Liguria on the northwestern part of the Italian peninsula.

Republic of Genoa
Repúbrica de Zêna  (Ligurian)
Res Publica Ianuensis  (Latin)
Repubblica di Genova  (Italian)
  • 11th century–1797
  • Apr 1814 – Jan 1815
Flag of Genoa
Flag
Coat of arms of Genoa
Coat of arms
Motto: Respublica superiorem non recognoscens
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CapitalGenoa
Common languagesLigurian
Italian
Latin
Corsican
Greek
Arabic
Religion
Roman Catholicism
GovernmentOligarchic merchant republic
Doge 
• 1339–1345
Simone Boccanegra (first)
• 1795–1797
Giacomo Maria Brignole (last)
Capitano del popolo 
• 1257–1262
Guglielmo Boccanegra (first)
• 1335–1339
Galeotto Spinola (last)
Podestà 
• 1191–1191
Manegoldo del Tettuccio (first)
• 1256–1256
Filippo della Torre (last)
LegislatureConsiglio della Repubblica
Great Council
Minor Council
Historical era
• Established
11th century
• Participation in the First Crusade
1096–1099
1261
• Establishment of the Gazaria
1266
1284
• Creation of the Dogate
1339
• Foundation of the Bank of Saint George
1407
• Andrea Doria's new constitution
1528
June 14, 1797
• Republic's revival
1814
• Disestablished
1815
Population
• Estimate
650,000 in the early 17th century[1]
CurrencyGenoese lira
(1138–1797)
Genovino
(1252–1415)
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Kingdom of Italy (imperial)
Ligurian Republic
Duchy of Savoy
Kingdom of Sardinia
Corsican Republic
Monaco

History change

Genoa was a powerful country, it created many colonies throughout the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, including Corsica from 1347 to 1768, Monaco, Southern Crimea from 1266 to 1475 and the islands of Lesbos and Chios from the 14th century to 1462 and 1566.

References change

  1. Smith, Preserved (1920). The Social Background of the Reformation. pp. 19.