Federal Aviation Administration

United States Government agency dedicated to civil aviation matters

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation. The FAA is the single most influential governmentally-run aviation agency in the world, with the European Aviation Safety Agency in a close second.

Federal Aviation Administration
Seal of the United States Federal Aviation Administration.svg
Seal of the Federal Aviation Administration
Flag of the United States Federal Aviation Administration.svg
Flag of the Federal Aviation Administration
DOT-FAA Headquarters by Matthew Bisanz.JPG
Headquarters of the FAA in Washington DC
Agency overview
FormedAugust 23, 1958; 64 years ago (1958-08-23)
Preceding agency
JurisdictionU.S. federal government
HeadquartersOrville Wright Federal Building
800 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, D.C., U.S. 20591
38°53′14.31″N 77°1′19.98″W / 38.8873083°N 77.0222167°W / 38.8873083; -77.0222167Coordinates: 38°53′14.31″N 77°1′19.98″W / 38.8873083°N 77.0222167°W / 38.8873083; -77.0222167
Annual budgetUS$15.956 billion (FY2010)
Agency executive
  • Billy Nolen, Administrator (Acting)
Parent agencyU.S. Department of Transportation
Websitewww.faa.gov
Footnotes
[1][2]

Major functionsEdit

The FAA's roles include:

  • Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation
  • Regulating air navigation facilities' geometric and flight inspection standards
  • Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology
  • Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates
  • Regulating civil aviation to promote transportation safety in the United States, especially through local offices called Flight Standards District Offices
  • Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft
  • Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics
  • Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation

ReferencesEdit

  1. Wald, Matthew L. (August 22, 2007). "F.A.A. Chief to Lead Industry Group". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 28, 2019. Retrieved July 28, 2019.
  2. Birnbaum, Jeffrey H. (August 22, 2007). "FAA Chief To Become Aerospace Lobbyist". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020. Retrieved July 28, 2019.

Other websitesEdit