OSIRIS-REx

American space probe

OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer) is a NASA asteroid-study and sample-return mission.[10]

OSIRIS-REx
OSIRIS-REx spacecraft model.png
Artist's rendering of the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft
NamesOrigins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer;
New Frontiers 3
Mission typeAsteroid sample return[1]
OperatorNASA / Lockheed Martin
COSPAR ID2016-055A
SATCAT no.41757
Websiteasteroidmission.org
Mission duration7 years (planned)
               505 days at asteroid
4 years, 2 months, 3 days (elapsed)
               710 days at asteroid
Spacecraft properties
ManufacturerLockheed Martin
Launch mass2,110 kg (4,650 lb)[2]
Dry mass880 kg (1,940 lb)[2]
Dimensions2.44 × 2.44 × 3.15 m (8 ft 0 in × 8 ft 0 in × 10 ft 4 in)[2]
Power1226 to 3000 W[2]
Start of mission
Launch date8 September 2016, 23:05 UTC[3]
RocketAtlas V 411, AV-067[3]
Launch siteCape Canaveral, SLC-41
ContractorUnited Launch Alliance
End of mission
Landing datePlanned: 24 September 2023, 15:00 (2023-09-24UTC16) UTC[4]
Landing siteUtah Test and Training Range[4]
Orbital parameters
Reference systemBennu-centric
Altitude0.68–2.1 km (0.42–1.30 mi)[5][6]
Period22–62 hours[7][6]
Flyby of Earth
Closest approach22 September 2017[2][8]
Distance17,237 km (10,711 mi)[8]
Bennu orbiter
Orbital insertion31 December 2018[9]
(Rendezvous: 3 December 2018)
Orbital departure3 March 2021 (planned)[2]
Sample mass60 g (2.1 oz) (planned)[4]
OSIRIS-REx mission logo (circa 2015).png
OSIRIS-REx mission logo
← Juno
 

The mission's main goal is to get a sample of at least 60 g (2.1 oz) from 101955 Bennu, a carbonaceous near-Earth asteroid, and return the sample to Earth for a detailed analysis.

The material returned is expected to enable scientists to learn more about the formation and evolution of the Solar System, its initial stages of planet formation, and the source of organic compounds that led to the formation of life on Earth.[11]

If successful, OSIRIS-REx will be the first United States spacecraft to return samples from an asteroid.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Brown, Dwayne C. (25 May 2011). "NASA To Launch New Science Mission To Asteroid In 2016". NASA. Retrieved 18 September 2016.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 "OSIRIS-REx: Asteroid Sample Return Mission" (PDF) (Press Kit). NASA. August 2016. Retrieved 18 September 2016.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Graham, William (8 September 2016). "Atlas V begins OSIRIS-REx's round trip to the asteroid Bennu". NASASpaceflight. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Ray, Justin (9 September 2016). "OSIRIS-REx probe launched to asteroid in compelling search for the origins of life". Astronomy Now. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  5. "NASA's OSIRIS-REx Mission Breaks Another Orbit Record". asteroidmission.org. NASA. 13 June 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2020.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "Mission Update February 25, 2019". asteroidmission.org. NASA. 25 February 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2020.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. "Mission Update August 12, 2019". asteroidmission.org. NASA. 12 August 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2020.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "NASA'S OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Slingshots Past Earth". NASA. 2017-09-22. Retrieved 2018-04-26.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  9. "NASA'S OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Arrives at Asteroid Bennu". NASA. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  10. "OSIRIS-REx Mission Selected for Concept Development". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 June 2012.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.