Self-defence

countermeasure that involves defending oneself, one's property, or the well-being of another from harm

Self-defence means fighting off something or another person to protect yourself and maybe others. Ways of self-defence include martial arts or using a weapon. Sometimes, self-defense can cause serious harm to the other person. In most nations, you cannot be prosecuted for this harm. In the United States, an act of self-defence can only count as self-defence if the victim is in a situation that can cause them serious injury or death. In international law all persons have the right to self-defence.[1]

Defence of othersEdit

The law of self-defence is the same when you protect others. Generally, you must have a good reason or belief that you needed to defend yourself in self-defence. However, in many places, if the court decides that the defence may have been too extreme, the person may face criminal and civil charges.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Zoran Milovanovich. "Civil and Political Rights". The Lincoln University. Archived from the original on 26 October 2015. Retrieved 29 October 2015.

Other websitesEdit