Waterfall frog

species of amphibian

The waterfall frog or torrent tree frog (Ranoidea nannotis) is a frog from Australia. Scientists have seen it between 180 and 1300 metres above sea level.[1][2][3]

Waterfall frog
Litoria nannotis.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Pelodryadidae
Genus: Ranoidea
Species:
R. nannotis
Binomial name
Ranoidea nannotis
(Andersson, 1916)
Synonyms
  • Hyla nannotis Andersson, 1916
  • Hyla obsoleta nannotis Copland, 1957
  • Nyctimystes nannotis Niell, 1954
  • Hyla nannotis Tyler, 1965
  • Litoria nannotis Tyler, 1971
  • Moseleyia nannotis Wells and Wellington, 1985
  • Dryopsophus nannotis Duellman, Marion, and Hedges, 2016
  • Ranoidea nannotis Dubois and Frétey, 2016[1]

The adult male frog is 3.2 to 5.2 cm long and the adult female frog is 4.8 to 5.9 cm long. This frog lives in fast-flowing streams in rainforests and other forests. It does not only lay its eggs in fast streams. It spends most of its time in or near the water. The adult frog is gray or olive on the back with mottling colors and a white belly. This frog can lay eggs at any time of year. The female frog lays her eggs underneath rocks. The tadpoles have strong tails for swimming and mouths on the underside of their bodies so they can hold onto rocks. Adult frogs hide in the stream or near waterfalls during the day and look for food at night. They usually do not go more than 35 metres away from the water.[2][4]

This frog eats almost any animal without bones inside that it can fit into its mouth. It will eat flies, dragonflies, beetles, true bugs, mites, bees, wasps, ants, insect larvae and millipedes.[2]

This frog is endangered. Scientists think this might be because feral pigs brought to Australia by humans rip up their streams, but they are not sure. Some scientists looked at whether habitat loss or or chemicals that humans use to kill insects might be killing the frogs, and they found this is probably not what is killing them. Some scientists think the fungal disease chytridiomycosis could be killing the frogs[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Ranoidea nannotis (Andersson, 1916)". American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 J-M Hero (March 15, 2002). "Litoria nannotis: Waterfall Frog, Torrent Tree Frog". Retrieved September 19, 2020. Unknown parameter |displayauthors= ignored (help)
  3. J.M. Hero; Richard Retallick (2004). "Litoria nannotis". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. p. e.T12148A3326626. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2004.RLTS.T12148A3326626.en. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  4. Wayne E. Martin (January 27, 2009). "Species profile—Litoria nannotis (Hylidae". Queensland Government. Retrieved September 19, 2020.