1911 England–Holland women's fencing competitions

The 1911 England–Holland women's fencing competitions were international fencing competition of British fencers against fencers of Salle De Vos, The Hage the Netherlands who visited London from 16-20 March 1911. The main reason for their visit was competition on 17 March organized as a celebration that fencing master D. Dreese who had been associated with Bertrands Fencing Academy for 20 years. During these four days, the competitions took place at the Bertrands Fencing Academy located at the Warwick Street in London, the United Kingdom.[1][2][3]

1911 England–Holland women's fencing competitions
VenueBertrands Fencing Academy
LocationWarwick Street, London, United Kingdom
Dates16 and 17 March 1911
Competitors12 from 2 nations
Teams2

BackgroundEdit

D. Dreese was a Dutch fencing master from Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He was a succesfull fencer winning many prizes and also a succesfull trainer. By invitation of French fencer Bertrand Marie de Lesseps, who was settled in London , Dreese became a fencing master at the Bertrand’s Fencing Academy in 1881. He became very successful in London and decided later to emigrate to the United Kingdom.

In 1910 there was an international meeting between England and Belgium were the English team was beaten by the Belgian team.[3]

TravelEdit

The Dutch team came to England by boat. The sea was turbulent during the boat trip. According to the newspaper De nieuwe courant everybody of the Dutch team became very seasick.[3]

16 MarchEdit

On 16 March a fencing competition took place between the five Dutch fencers of Salle De Vos against five British fencers of the Bertrands Fencing Academy. The British team included the 1908-1909 British champion Millicent Hall and the 1910 British champion Julia Johnstone.[3]

The jury consisted of members from as much as possible different fencing clubs, which was praised in the Dutch media. The jury members were: E. Martin Eduard was president (Bertrands Fencing Academy), miss. Cater (Oxford Fencing Club), misrs. Eduards (salle Margri), miss. French (Oxford Fencing Club), miss. G. Daniels (Alexander House Gym.) and miss. A. B. Wakker (Kessards F. Club).[3]

The Dutch team lost the competition with 17 against 8 points.[4] Millicent Hall and Julia Johnstone were mentioned to be many times better than the other British fencers. Miss D. Cheetham was small but very fast.[3] C. van Doorn was the best Dutch fencer, winning four of her five matches, including beating Millicent Hall. Of the other Dutch fencers the attitude was admired of E. van den Bergh and the calm of fencers Luden and Julia Beelaerts van Blokland. H. van den Bergh underperformed, because she had not yet recovered from her seasickness.[3]

17 MarchEdit

In the evening of 17 March 1911 was the celebration of fencing master D. Dreese who had been associated with Bertrands Fencing Academy for 20 years. Baron Gericke van Herwijnen had accepted the presidency on this matter. The competitions were led by N. Butterworth. Some important attendees this evening were jonkheer Quarles van Ufford, baron Leopold and dr. Rothschild A main part of this celebration was the women's competitions of fencers from the Bertrands Fencing Academy against women's fencers of Salle De Vos.[3]

The academy was partly decorated with Dutch flags.[3] The competitions were preceded by an orchestra playing the Dutch national anthem (Wilhelmus) and the English national anthem (God save the Queen).[1] The five women's fencers of Salle De Vos competed against five known British fencers.[4] The Dutch ladies wore the flag of the Netherlands and orange on their arm.

The Dutch ladies won multiple matches.[4] Newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad writes about the matches: "The Dutch ladies... ...showed themselves completely equal to the English fencers and received well-deserved applause from the large numbers of ladies and gentlemen".[1]

Next to the women's competition there were matches of main fencers of the Bertrands Fencing Academy.[1]

18-20 MarchEdit

In the days after the competitions there were some small events as part of the visit of the Dutch team. On 18 March there was a friendly gathering of all fencers of Bertrands Fencing Academy with the Dutch team.[3] On 20 March the Women's Fencing Club gave an assaut, in honor of the visit of the Dutch team. As seen as an In exepctional, mr. de Vos was a the only man allowed to visit the women's club.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "Hollandsche schermsters te Londen". Algemeen Handelsblad (in Dutch). 20 March 1911. Retrieved 1 August 2022 – via Delpher.
  2. "Schermen". De Avondpost (in Dutch). 21 March 1911. Retrieved 1 August 2022 – via Delpher.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 "Damesmatch Engeland-Holland". De nieuwe courant (in Dutch). 21 March 1911. Retrieved 1 August 2022 – via Delpher.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Haagsche dames te Londen". Het vaderland (in Dutch). 20 March 1911. Retrieved 1 August 2022 – via Delpher.