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Luc Montagnier

French virologist and joint recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Luc Antoine Montagnier (born 18 August 1932 in Chabris, Indre, France) is a French virologist and joint recipient with Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Harald zur Hausen of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine,[1] for the discovery made by his team, and particularly Françoise Baré-Sinoussi of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). He currently works as a full time professor at Shanghai Jiaotong University.[2]

Luc Antoine Montagnier
Luc Montagnier-press conference Dec 06th, 2008-6.jpg
Luc Montagnier, 2008
Born (1932-08-18) 18 August 1932 (age 86)
Chabris, France
NationalityFrench
Known forDiscovery of HIV
Awards2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Scientific career
FieldsVirology
InstitutionsPasteur Institute Shanghai Jiao Tong University

He has been discredited by his Nobel peers because of the many fake and dangerous theories he tries to spread[3], such as "DNA teleportation" or Papaya Cure for AIDS or Parkinson disease. In 2009 he published two controversial research studies which, if true, "would be the most significant experiments performed in the past 90 years, demanding re-evaluation of the whole conceptual framework of modern chemistry".[4] Homeopaths claim his research as support for homeopathy, but Montagnier himself says it cannot be extended to homeopathy.[5] Many scientists have greeted it with scorn and harsh criticism.[4][6][7]

He received the Legion of Honour.

Related pagesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. news.bbc.co.uk, Nobel prize for viral discoveries
  2. SJTU Appointed Luc Montagnier University Chair Professor
  3. "Les propos sur les vaccins de Luc Montagnier lui valent un tollé". Libération.fr (in French). Retrieved 2018-06-21.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Andy Coghlan, "Scorn over claim of teleported DNA", New Scientist 12 January 2011, issue 2795
  5. Cure Or Con? CBC Marketplace
  6. PZ Myers 2011. Pharyngula "It almost makes me disbelieve that HIV causes AIDS!",
  7. Editorial, "Why we have to teleport disbelief", New Scientist 12 January 2011, issue 2795