Mira

red giant star
This is a picture of Mira out of the Hubble Space Telescope.

Mira is a binary star system with a white dwarf (Mira B, also known as VZ Ceti) star and a red giant (Mira A). Scientists think Mira is 200-400 light years away in the constellation Cetus. Mira is known to change size over time. Other red giant stars that do the same are called Mira variables.

SizeEdit

Mira has a diameter 332[1] to 541[2] times that of our sun.

If Mira did not change size, its diameter would be only 240 times larger than the Sun.[1]

Related pagesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Wood, P. R.; Wittkowski, M.; Weigelt, G.; Scholz, M.; Schöller, M.; Schertl, D.; Richichi, A.; Ohnaka, K.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Driebe, T.; Eberhardt, M.; Woodruff, H. C. (1 July 2004). "Interferometric observations of the Mira star o Ceti with the VLTI/VINCI instrument in the near-infrared". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 421 (2): 703–714. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20035826 – via www.aanda.org.
  2. Menten, K. M.; Kemper, F.; Verhoelst, T.; Justtanont, K.; Koter, A. de; Decin, L.; Beck, E. De (1 November 2010). "Probing the mass-loss history of AGB and red supergiant stars from CO rotational line profiles - II. CO line survey of evolved stars: derivation of mass-loss rate formulae". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 523: A18. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200913771 – via www.aanda.org.