Molasses

viscous by-product of the refining of sugarcane, grapes, or sugar beets into sugar, often used in cookie baking
Blackstrap molasses

Molasses (Known as treacle in the United Kingdom if it was made to be eaten by humans) is a by-product of sugar canes or sugar beets being turned into sugar. It is like a thick syrup. Some people also call molasses sorghum syrup. The quality of the molasses depends on how the sugar is refined. Molasses is like a black golden syrup type liquid.

Molasses is the base for making rum. Sometimes vodka is also made from molasses.

HistoryEdit

Molasses was first imported to United States by British, (The Sugar Act, 1764), during the early times of the United States. The United States got sugar from southern islands. While the United States was getting sugar, they decided to ask for the leftover material, or molasses. The United States then used the molasses for their personal use, as well as making it into rum to trade with other nations.