Nanda (Hinduism)

Foster- father of the Hindu God, Krishna.

Nanda (also known as Mandaladhish Nanda Rai or Nanda Baba), according to the Harivamsha and the Puranas, was the head of the Gopas tribe of Yadava cowherds referred as Holy Gwals. Nanda was a Kshatriya and a King. He is popularly known as the foster-father of Krishna.[1][2] Nandvanshi Ahirs are descendants of Nanda.

Nanda was the Chief or Mandaladhish of Gokul Mandal that was one of the most powerful Divisional area of Yadava.[3] Nanda was brother (cousin)[4] of King Vasudeva.[3][5] Vasudeva, took his new-born son Krishna to Nanda on the night of the child's birth so that Nanda could raise him. Nanda, who was married to Yasoda, brought up both Krishna and Balarama. Krishna derives his name Nandanandana (meaning son of Nanda) from him.[6][7]

References

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  1. Soni, Lok Nath (2000). The Cattle and the Stick: An Ethnographic Profile of the Raut of Chhattisgarh. Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture. ISBN 978-81-85579-57-3. The story goes that Krishna was a prince of royal blood, the son of Vasudeva. He lived with Nanda, who was also a king and Kshatriya by caste. Vasudeva and Nanda were brothers When Vasudeva knew that Nanda has come to Mathura to pay the taxes of King Kansa, he went to his brother Nanda. The point that the Abhira are Kshatriyas and specifically Yaduvansi. In Harivamsa Purana, it has been said that Gopas and Yadav are generic of same lineage and they are called Gope or Yadav.
  2. Prabhupada, His Divine Grace A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami. Krsna, the Supreme Personality of Godhead. The Bhaktivedanta Book Trust. ISBN 978-91-7149-558-7.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Gopal Chowdhary (2014). The Greatest Farce of History. Partridge Publishing. p. 119. ISBN 978-1482819250.
  4. Sanghi, Ashwin (2012). The Krishna key. Chennai: Westland. p. Key7. ISBN 9789381626689. Retrieved 9 June 2016.[permanent dead link]
  5. Lok Nath Soni (2000). The Cattle and the Stick: An Ethnographic Profile of the Raut of Chhattisgarh. Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture, Delhi: Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture, 2000 Original from the University of Michigan. p. 16. ISBN 978-8185579573.
  6. John Stratton Hawley (2014). At Play with Krishna: Pilgrimage Dramas from Brindaran. Princeton Legacy Library: Princeton University Press. p. 316. ISBN 978-1400859122.
  7. Charles Barnett (2014). Blazing Sadhus or Never Trust a Holy Man Who Can't Dance. Charles Barnett. pp. III. ISBN 978-1632958624.[permanent dead link]