Perseus (constellation)

constellation in the northern celestial hemisphere

Perseus is a constellation in the northern sky named after Perseus, the mitological greek hero.[1] Perseus is located in the northern celestial hemisphere.[2][3] The brightest star in Perseus is Alpha Persei, that has an apparent magnitude (brightness as viewed from Earth) of 1.8.[1] The best-known star in Perseus is Algol, which is known by its variability in brightness, that can be noted by the naked eye.[4] Algol is a star system formed by multiple stars, of which two eclipses each other and creates the brightess variation.[4] The Perseids are a meteor shower located in Perseus, that are proeminent during the months of July and August.[5] Perseus' border constellations are: Aries, Taurus, Auriga, Camelopardalis, Cassiopeia, Andromeda and Triangulum.

Perseus
Constellation
Perseus
AbbreviationPer
GenitivePersei
Pronunciation/ˈpɜːrsəs/ or /ˈpɜːrsjuːs/;
genitive /ˈpɜːrs./
SymbolismPerseus
Right ascension3
Declination+45
QuadrantNQ1
Area615 sq. deg. (24th)
Main stars19
Bayer/Flamsteed
stars
65
Stars with planets7
Stars brighter than 3.00m5
Stars within 10.00 pc (32.62 ly)0
Brightest starα Per (Mirfak) (1.79m)
Messier objects2
Meteor showersPerseids
September Perseids
Bordering
constellations
Aries
Taurus
Auriga
Camelopardalis
Cassiopeia
Andromeda
Triangulum
Visible at latitudes between +90° and −35°.
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of December.
  1. 1.0 1.1 "Perseus | Mythology, Stars, Constellations | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 2024-03-01.
  2. Waldek, Stefanie (2019-11-20). "Perseus constellation: Facts, location and myth". Space.com. Retrieved 2024-03-01.
  3. "Chandra :: Photo Album :: Constellation Perseus". chandra.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2024-03-01.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Perseus the Hero and a Demon Star | Sky Archive | EarthSky". earthsky.org. 2022-10-27. Retrieved 2024-03-01.
  5. "The Perseus Constellation | Pictures, Facts, and Location". AstroBackyard. Retrieved 2024-03-01.