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Stanley Falkow

American microbiologist

Stanley Falkow, PhD, (24 January, 1934 – 5 May, 2018) was an American microbiologist and a professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine.[1] He was known for his study of how infectious microbes and host cells interact to cause disease at the molecular level.[2] He created molecular Koch's postulates, which have guided the study of the microbial determinants of infectious diseases since the late 1980s.[3]

Stanley Falkow

Stanley Falkow.jpg
Falkow in 2009
Born24 January, 1934
Died5 May, 2018 (aged 84)
Alma materUniversity of Maine
OccupationMicrobiologist and professor
Awards
Websitemed.stanford.edu/profiles/stanley-falkow

Falkow died on May 5, 2018 at the age of 84 at his home in Portola Valley, California of complications from myelodysplastic syndrome.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Stanley Falkow, Ph.D. Archived 2007-07-03 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on July 4, 2007
  2. The Double Helix NFID to Honor Dr. Falkow Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on July 4, 2007
  3. Falkow S (1988). "Molecular Koch's postulates applied to microbial pathogenicity." Rev Infect Dis 10(Suppl 2):S274-S276.
  4. Kolata, Gina (May 10, 2018). "Stanley Falkow, Who Saw How Bacteria Cause Disease, Dies at 84". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2018-05-11. Retrieved May 11, 2018.