Wahhabi

religious movement or branch of Sunni Islam

Wahhabi (Arabic: Al-Wahhābīyyaالوهابية) or Wahhabism is a conservative form of Sunni Islam practised in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. The name 'Wahhabi' or 'Wahhabism' comes from Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab, an 18th century scholar, who popularised a form of Islam that calls for the return to the Qur'an and Hadith as the basis of an Islamic way of life[1].

Some definitions or uses of the term Wahhabi Islam include:

  • "a corpus of doctrines, but also a set of attitudes and behaviour". Gilles Kepel.[2]
  • "pure Islam that does not deviate from Sharia law in any way and should be called Islam and not Wahhabism". Prince Salman bin Abdul Aziz, the governor of the Saudi capital Riyadh.[3][4]
  • "a misguided creed that fosters intolerance, promotes simplistic theology, and restricts Islam's capacity for adaption to diverse and shifting circumstances". David Commins, paraphrasing opponents' definition.[4]
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Other websites

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References

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  1. Ḥurūb, H̱ālid al-; London Middle East Institute, eds. (2010). Political islam: context versus ideology. SOAS Middle East issues. London: Saqi [u.a.] pp. 48, 49. ISBN 978-0-86356-659-2.
  2. Kepel, Gilles (2004). The war for Muslim minds. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. p. 157. ISBN 9780674015753.
  3. Mahdi, Wael (March 18, 2010). "There is no such thing as Wahabism, Saudi prince says". The National. Abu Dhabi Media. Archived from the original on 27 April 2014. Retrieved 12 June 2014.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Commins, David (2009). The Wahhabi mission and Saudi Arabia. I.B.Tauris. pp. viv. While Wahhabism claims to represent Islam in its purest form, other Muslims consider it a misguided creed that fosters intolerance, promotes simplistic theology, and restricts Islam's capacity for adaption to diverse and shifting circumstances.