Bing Crosby

American singer and actor (1903–1977)

Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby Jr. (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor. His singing career was around fifty years long and more than 1 billion records of his have been sold worldwide.[1][2][3] Crosby is known for creating the style of music that Perry Como,[4] Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin , Elvis Presley,[5] John Lennon[5] would later copy. Crosby said that he was inspired by Al Jolson.[6]

Bing Crosby
Crosby c. 1940
Born
Harry Lillis Crosby Jr.

(1903-05-03)May 3, 1903
DiedOctober 14, 1977(1977-10-14) (aged 74)
Alcobendas, Spain
Resting placeHoly Cross Cemetery
Alma materGonzaga University
Occupations
  • Singer
  • actor
Years active1923–1977
Spouses
ChildrenGary, Dennis, Phillip, Lindsay (with Dixie)
Harry III, Mary, Nathaniel (with Kathryn)
Relatives
Musical career
Genres
Labels
Websitebingcrosby.com
Signature

He sang "White Christmas" and it became "the best-selling record of all time." Irving Berlin wrote this song.[7] In 1962, Crosby became the first person ever to receive the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.[8]

Crosby won the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his role in Going My Way.

Crosby was a Roman Catholic.[9] He died of a heart attack in Madrid, Spain.

References

change
  1. Hope, Robert (January 28, 2020). Bing Crosby: The Billion Selling Man.
  2. Abjorensen, Norman (2017-05-25). Historical Dictionary of Popular Music. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-1-5381-0215-2.
  3. America in the 20th Century. Marshall Cavendish. ISBN 978-0-7614-7369-5.
  4. Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN 978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC 31611854. Cassette 1, side B.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Giddins, Gary (2001-01-28). "MUSIC; Bing Crosby, The Unsung King of Song". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  6. Gilliland 1994, cassette 3, side B.
  7. Harris, Roy J. (2009-12-11). "Irving Berlin's White Christmas | Masterpiece by Roy J. Harris Jr. - WSJ.com". Online.wsj.com. Retrieved 2010-04-20.
  8. "GRAMMY.com". GRAMMY.com. 2009-02-08. Archived from the original on 2010-02-06. Retrieved 2010-03-04.
  9. Bing Crosby as Father O'Malley