2015 Canadian federal election

Canadian general election

The 2015 Canadian federal election (formally the 42nd Canadian general election) was held on October 19, 2015, to elect members to the House of Commons of the 42nd Canadian Parliament and the Prime Minister of Canada. The 2015 election were issued by Governor General David Johnston on August 4.

2015 Canadian federal election

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← List of House members of the 41st Parliament of Canada
List of House members of the 42nd Parliament of Canada →

All 338 seats in the House of Commons
170 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Turnout68.3%[1] (Increase7.2pp)
  First party Second party Third party
  Justin Trudeau APEC 2015 (cropped).jpg Stephen Harper 2014 (cropped).jpg Thomas Mulcair 2015 (cropped).jpg
Leader Justin Trudeau Stephen Harper Thomas Mulcair
Party Liberal Conservative New Democratic
Leader since April 14, 2013 March 20, 2004 March 24, 2012
Leader's seat Papineau Calgary Heritage Outremont
Last election 34 seats, 18.91% 166 seats, 39.62% 103 seats, 30.63%
Seats before 36 159 95
Seats won 184 99 44
Seat change Increase148 Decrease60 Decrease51
Popular vote 6,943,276 5,613,614 3,470,350
Percentage 39.47% 31.89% 19.71%
Swing Increase20.56pp Decrease7.73pp Decrease10.92pp

  Fourth party Fifth party
  Gilles Duceppe 2011 (cropped).jpg Elizabeth May 2014 (cropped).jpg
Leader Gilles Duceppe Elizabeth May
Party Bloc Québécois Green
Leader since June 10, 2015 August 27, 2006
Leader's seat Ran in Laurier—Sainte-Marie (lost) Saanich—Gulf Islands
Last election 4 seats, 6.04% 1 seat, 3.91%
Seats before 2 2
Seats won 10 1
Seat change Increase8 Decrease1
Popular vote 821,144 602,944
Percentage 4.66% 3.45%
Swing Decrease1.38pp Decrease0.46pp

Canada 2015 Federal Election.svg
Popular vote by province, with graphs indicating the number of seats won within that province. (Because seats are awarded by the popular vote in each riding, the provincial popular vote does not necessarily translate to more seats.)

Prime Minister before election

Stephen Harper
Conservative

Prime Minister after election

Justin Trudeau
Liberal

The election was one of the longest in Canadian history.[2] It was also the first time since the 1979 election that a Prime Minister attempted to remain in office into a fourth consecutive Parliament and the first time since the 1980 election that someone attempted to win a fourth term of any kind as Prime Minister.

The Liberal Party, led by Justin Trudeau, won 184 seats, allowing it to form a majority government with Trudeau becoming the next Prime Minister.[3] Trudeau was sworn in on November 4, 2015.[4]

ResultsEdit

184 99 44 10 1
Liberal Conservative New Democratic B
Q
G
Party Votes Seats
Liberal 6,943,276 39.5%   20.6%
184 / 338 (54%)
Conservative 5,613,614 31.9%   7.7%
99 / 338 (29%)
New Democratic 3,470,350 19.7%   10.9%
44 / 338 (13%)
Bloc Québécois 821,144 4.7%   1.2%
10 / 338 (3%)
Green 602,944 3.4%   0.5%
1 / 338 (0.3%)

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. "Federal election voter turnout 68.3 per cent, highest in 22 years: official vote count". CBC.ca. November 5, 2015. Retrieved June 3, 2016.
  2. Only the first two election campaigns after Confederation were longer: 81 days in 1867 and 96 days in 1872. In those early days voting was staggered across the country over a period of several months, necessarily extending the length of the campaigns. Since then, the longest campaign was 74 days, in 1926. (Canadian Press, "Imminent federal election to be costliest, longest in recent Canadian history". Toronto Sun, 29 July 2015)
  3. Zurcher, Anthony (20 October 2015). "Trudeau brings Liberals back on top". BBC News. Retrieved 22 October 2015.
  4. Patricia Treble. "When does Justin Trudeau become prime minister?". Macleans.ca. Retrieved October 28, 2015.