Forza Italia

Italian political party (1994–2009)

Forza Italia (FI; translated to "Forward Italy"[2][9][10][11][12][13] or "Let's Go Italy"[14][15][16][17]) was a centre-right[8] political party in Italy with liberal-conservative,[2][3][18][19] Christian-democratic,[4][8][20] liberal,[4][8][20][21] social-democratic[4] and populist[5][6][7] ideas. Its leader was Silvio Berlusconi, who was Prime Minister of Italy four times.

Forza Italia
PresidentSilvio Berlusconi
Vice PresidentGiulio Tremonti (2004–2009)
Roberto Formigoni (2008–2009)
Founded18 January 1994
Dissolved27 March 2009
Merged intoThe People of Freedom
HeadquartersVia dell'Umiltà 36, Rome
Student wingStudents for the Freedoms
Youth wingForza Italia – Young People for Freedom
Membership (2007)400,000[1]
IdeologyLiberal conservatism[2][3]
Christian democracy[4]
Liberalism[4]
Populism[5][6][7]
Social democracy[4] (minority)
Political positionCentre-right[8]
National affiliationPole of Freedoms/Pole of Good Government (1994),
Pole for Freedoms (1996–2001),
House of Freedoms (2001–2008)
European affiliationEuropean People's Party (1999–2009)
European Parliament groupForza Europa (1994–1995),
Union for Europe (1995–1998),
EPP–ED (1998–2009)
Colours  Azure

ReferencesEdit

  1. ""Forza Italia ha raggiunto quota 400mila iscritti"". Il Giornale. 10 March 2007. Archived from the original on 3 February 2018. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Nordsieck, Wolfram. "Italy". Parties and Elections in Europe. Archived from the original on 31 October 2007. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ruzza; Fella (2009). Re-inventing the Italian Right. p. 128.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Chiara Moroni, Da Forza Italia al Popolo della Libertà, Carocci, Rome 2008
  5. 5.0 5.1 Woods, Dwayne (2014). The Many Faces of Populism in Italy: The Northern League and Berlusconism. The Many Faces of Populism: Current Perspectives. Emerald Group. pp. 28, 41–44.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ruzza; Fella (2009). Re-inventing the Italian Right. pp. 136–140, 217–218.
  7. 7.0 7.1 von Beyme, Klaus (2011). Representative democracy and the populist temptation. The Future of Representative Democracy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 59, 64–65.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Maurizio Cotta; Luca Verzichelli (12 May 2007). Political Institutions of Italy. Oxford University Press. p. 39. ISBN 978-0-19-928470-2. Retrieved 24 August 2012.
  9. Michael J. Romano (4 October 2010). CliffsNotes AP European History with CD-ROM. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 231–. ISBN 978-0-470-55100-4.
  10. Bertrand Badie; Dirk Berg-Schlosser; Leonardo Morlino (7 September 2011). International Encyclopedia of Political Science. SAGE Publications. pp. 1796–. ISBN 978-1-4522-6649-7.
  11. Thomas Jansen; Steven Van Hecke (2011). At Europe's Service: The Origins and Evolution of the European People's Party. Springer. p. 63. ISBN 978-3-642-19414-6.
  12. Tom Lansford (24 March 2015). Political Handbook of the World 2015. SAGE Publications. pp. 3066–. ISBN 978-1-4833-7155-9.
  13. Donatella M. Viola (14 August 2015). Routledge Handbook of European Elections. Routledge. pp. 115–. ISBN 978-1-317-50363-7.
  14. Stephen Gundle; Simon Parker (1 November 2002). The New Italian Republic: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to Berlusconi. Routledge. pp. 135–. ISBN 978-1-134-80791-8.
  15. Peter Mair; Wolfgang C Müller; Fritz Plasser (9 June 2004). Political Parties and Electoral Change: Party Responses to Electoral Markets. SAGE Publications. pp. 144–. ISBN 978-0-7619-4719-6.
  16. Stephen P. Koff (7 March 2013). Italy: From the 1st to the 2nd Republic. Routledge. pp. 44–. ISBN 978-1-134-64369-1.
  17. J. Colomer (5 January 2016). The Handbook of Electoral System Choice. Palgrave Macmillan UK. pp. 244–. ISBN 978-0-230-52274-9.
  18. Orsina, Giovanni (2014). Berlusconism and Italy: A Historical Interpretation. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 169.
  19. Svante Ersson; Jan-Erik Lane (1999). Politics and Society in Western Europe. SAGE. p. 108. ISBN 978-0-7619-5862-8. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Carol Diane St Louis (2011). Negotiating Change: Approaches to and the Distributional Implications of Social Welfare and Economic Reform. Stanford University. p. 132. STANFORD:RW793BX2256. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  21. Oreste Massari, I partiti politici nelle democrazie contempoiranee, Laterza, Rome-Bari 2004