Richard H. Watson

Richard H. Watson is a New Zealand-born[1][3] American Biotechnology researcher, known for introducing grass-based dairies in Georgia.[4][5] Watson specializes in animal nutrition and grazing systems.[6][7][8]

Dr. Richard H. Watson
Richard H Watson.jpg
NationalityNew Zealand[1]
Other namesR. H. Watson
Alma materMassey University
OccupationBiotechnology Scientist[2]
Years active1994–present
Known forAnimal Bioscience research

CareerEdit

In 1994, Watson obtained Bachelors in Agricultural Science from Massey University (Palmerston North, New Zealand) and Masters degree in Applied Science in 1995.[9][10][11] Watson received his PhD for Animal science and Grazing systems in 2000 and subsequently recruited by the University of Georgia to lead a cattle grazing research program in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences where he helped developed a statewide grazing research program for cattle producers, looking at new forage and grazing technologies.[12][13][14]

Watson served as the State Extension Forage Specialist and Assistant Research Professor at Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at Mississippi State University between January 2004 to August 2006.[15][16][17]

Notable publicationsEdit

  • Reinfection of Tall Fescue Cultivars with Non-Ergot Alkaloid–Producing Endophytes[18]
  • Liveweight and growth rate of cow-calf pairs grazing tall fescue pastures infected with either non-toxic (MaxQ) or toxic endophyte strains. Journal of Animal Science 79, Suppl. 1: 220.[19]
  • Use of temperature data loggers to measure body temperature in cows grazing toxic or non-toxic tall fescue. Journal of Animal Science 79, Suppl. 1: 458.
  • Non-toxic endophyte (MaxQ) use for alleviating tall fescue toxicosis in stocker cattle. Journal of Animal Science 79, Suppl. 1: 220[20]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 "New Zealanders find common ground in Burke County". The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  2. "Grass finished livestock will be focus of forage and grassland conferences". Virginia Tech. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  3. "The Milkman Delivers". Progressive Farmer. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  4. "Sweet Match Between a Herd of Cows and a Paddock of Forages". The Progressive Farmer. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  5. "Supper. "Grazing Systems: New Zealand vs. Georgia"" (PDF). University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Page 2). Retrieved 19 November 2017.[permanent dead link]
  6. "SU AgCenter Schedules Dairy Field Day For March 31". Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  7. "Ball Clover Seed - Great for Honey Bees - 10 Lbs". Seed Ranch. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  8. "Clover provides nitrogen for soil, forage for cattle". Delta Farm Press. 16 April 2004. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  9. After the hurricane (PDF) (2006 ed.). Massey University. p. 33. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  10. "We Proudly Welcome and DEVELOPMENTS Introduce New Employee" (PDF). Ampac Seed Company. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  11. "Ewe reproductive performance and growth rate of suckling-lambs on endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass pasture" (PDF). grassland.org.nz. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  12. "Stocker Growth Expectations". The Cattle Site. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  13. "Fairlie Seed Company - Protein Analysis". Ballclover.com. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  14. "Cattle Today: CATTLE PRODUCERS LOOK FOR FEEDING OPTIONS". cattletoday.com. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  15. "Feed less hay, grow high quality forage". southeast FarmPress. 4 October 2006. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  16. "QDMA Canada - Chicory: A Powerful Perennial". The Quality Deer Management Association. Archived from the original on 2017-11-09. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  17. "Dr. Richard Watson Dept. of Plant and Soil Sciences". Texas A&M University. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  18. "Reinfection of Tall Fescue Cultivars with Non-Ergot Alkaloid–Producing Endophytes". Agronomy Journal. 1 May 2002. doi:10.2134/agronj2002.5670. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  19. "Productivity of cow–calf pairs grazing tall fescue pastures infected with either the wild-type endophyte or a nonergot alkaloid-producing endophyte strain, AR542" (PDF). Semantic Scholar. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  20. "Use of nonergot alkaloid-producing endophytes for alleviating tall fescue toxicosis in stocker cattle". Journal of Animal Science. 1 November 2003. doi:10.2527/2003.81112856x. Retrieved 19 November 2017.[permanent dead link]