Troms og Finnmark

former county of Norway (2020–2023)

Troms og Finnmark, ('Troms and Finnmark'), was a county in northern Norway. Its last day, was the last day of 2023.

Troms og Finnmark
Tromsø, Troms og Finnmark
Tromsø, Troms og Finnmark
Flag of Troms og Finnmark
Location of Troms og Finnmark
Location of Troms og Finnmark
Government
 • BodyTroms og Finnmark County Municipality
 • Mayor (2019)Ivar B. Prestbakmo
 • Governor (2019)Elisabeth Aspaker
Area
 • Total74,831 km2 (28,892 sq mi)
 • Land70,925 km2 (27,384 sq mi)
 • Water3,908 km2 (1,509 sq mi)
 • Rank
  1. 1 in Norway
Population
 • Total242,168
 • Rank
  1. 10 in Norway
 • Density3.4/km2 (9/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (Central European Time)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2
Websitetffk.no


It was created in 2020 by merging the former counties of Troms and Finnmark.[1] The county has a population of about 244,000 and covers an area of 74,840 square kilometers.[2]

On January 1, 2024, the county will be split into separate counties: Finnmark and Troms; Parliament decided that in June 2022; The Tjeldsund Municipality from Nordland county will belong to Troms county.[3][4][5][6]

Geography and Landscape change

 
Fish farming in Troms og Finnmark with landscape in background

Troms og Finnmark is located in the northernmost part of Norway and is bordered by the counties of Nordland to the south, and Finnmark to the east. The county is also bordered by Sweden, Finland, and Russia to the east.

The landscape of Troms og Finnmark has both coastal and mountainous terrain. The county is home to several national parks, including Reisa National Park and Øvre Dividal National Park. [7][8]

Cities and Communitites change

 
Tromsø

Tromsø is the biggest city in the Troms og Finnmark region of Norway. It is located in the northern part of the country, above the Arctic Circle. Tromsø is known for its beautiful nature, including mountains, fjords, and Northern Lights. The city is also home to many cultural attractions, such as museums and festivals.[9] It has a population of around 75,000 people.[10]

The economy of Troms og Finnmark is largely based on fishing, aquaculture, and the oil and gas industry.[11][12] The county is also home to several indigenous communities, including the Sámi people, who have a long history in the region.[13]

Sámi People change

Indigenous communities are groups of people who have lived in a particular place for a very long time. In many countries, these communities have unique traditions, languages, and ways of life that are important to preserve and celebrate.[14]

One such community in the Nordic countries is the Sámi. They have lived in northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, and parts of Russia for thousands of years. The Sámi have their own language, called Sámi, which has several different dialects.[15]

The Sámi traditionally relied on reindeer herding, fishing, and hunting to sustain themselves. They also had a deep spiritual connection to the natural world and believed in the importance of respecting and protecting the environment.[13][15]

Today, the Sami people continue to maintain their traditions and cultural practices, such as the Sámi National Day, which is celebrated on February 6th.[13][15]

Tourism and Recreation change

Hiking is one of the most popular activities in the region, as there are numerous trails for hikers of all levels of experience. The mountainous landscape of Troms og Finnmark makes hiking in this region very popular.[16]

Skiing is also a popular pastime in Troms og Finnmark, with its numerous mountains and ski resorts offering many ways to access skiing in Norway. Like hiking trails, there are also options available for all levels of experience.[17]

Fishing is another popular activity in the region, with its rivers and lakes teeming with fish. The region is known for its salmon fishing.[11][18]

Indigenous and Cultural Attractions change

The Sámi also play a role in tourism and recreation. There are several buildings in Tromsø built around Sámi cultures and traditions. There are also tours that teach people about their beliefs and ways of doing things.[19]

 
The Arctic Cathedral

One of the buildings that are associated with the Sámi includes the Arctic Cathedral. The Arctic Cathedral was built in 1965 in the shape of an iceberg and is known for its large stained-glass windows and wood carvings.[20][21]

Another important cultural attraction in Tromsø is the Sami Siida Museum. The museum is dedicated to the Sámi, who are the indigenous people of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. The Sami Siida Museum allow visitors to learn about the culture and traditions of the Sámi. The museum features exhibits on traditional Sámi clothing, crafts, and music, as well as a collection of Sámi artifacts and artwork.[22][23]

In addition to these two main attractions, there are many other cultural and historical sites to explore in Tromsø. For example, the Polar Museum features exhibits on the lives of Norwegian explorers such as Fridtjof Nansen and Roald Amundsen, who were among the first to explore the Arctic and Antarctic regions.[24][25]

References change

  1. "Fylkesinndelingen fra 2024". Regjeringen.no (in Norwegian). 2022-07-05. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  2. Mæhlum, Lars (2023-02-06), "Troms og Finnmark", Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian), archived from the original on 2019-10-27, retrieved 2023-03-17
  3. Føleide, Anita (2022-06-14). "Vedtatt i Stortinget: Storfylkene skal splittes igjen, nå ønsker de ansatte ro og forutsigbarhet". NRK (in Norwegian Bokmål). Archived from the original on 2022-11-15. Retrieved 2022-09-20.
  4. Lægland, Martin (29 October 2021). "Vedum: Startet prosessen med oppløsning av Troms og Finnmark". Verdens Gang. Archived from the original on 26 October 2022. Retrieved 29 October 2021.
  5. "Troms og Finnmark splittes: Slik svarer Vedum om Alta". 29 October 2021. Archived from the original on 26 October 2022. Retrieved 17 March 2023.
  6. "Bestemt i fylkestinget: Troms og Finnmark skilles". www.vg.no. Archived from the original on 26 February 2022. Retrieved 25 February 2022.
  7. "Reisa National Park". Reisa Nasjonalpark. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  8. "Øvre Dividal National Park Norway's national parks". Nasjonalparker. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  9. "Tromsø attractions". Visit Tromso. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  10. "Tromsø (Municipality, Troms og Finnmark, Norway) - Population Statistics, Charts, Map and Location". www.citypopulation.de. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  11. 11.0 11.1 by, Presented; Lillegård, Morgan (2022-05-18). "The fisheries and fishing industry in Troms and Finnmark is growing". partner.sciencenorway.no. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  12. "Oil and Gas Extraction Companies in Troms Og Finnmark, Norway". DNB. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 "Sami | People, History, & Lifestyle | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Archived from the original on 2022-01-08. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  14. "Partnering with Indigenous People and Local Communities". The Nature Conservancy. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 Chandler, Gemma (2019-12-17). "Fascinating facts about the Sámi people". National Geographic Kids. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  16. Wikiloc. "The Best Hiking Trails in Troms og Finnmark (Norway) | Wikiloc". Wikiloc | Trails of the World. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  17. "Ekte skiglede og gode opplevelser". Tromsø Alpinpark. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  18. "Fishing in Tromsø". Visit Tromso. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  19. "Land of the Sami - The Sami way of life". www.visitnorway.com. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  20. "The Arctic Cathedral". www.visitnorway.com. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  21. "The Arctic Cathedral". Visit Tromso. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  22. "The Sámi Museum – Siida". Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  23. "Siida - The Sámi Museum and Nature Centre - A Window into Sámi Culture and Arctic Nature Inari". Discovering Finland. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  24. "The Polar Museum | University of Cambridge Museums". www.museums.cam.ac.uk. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.
  25. "The Polar Museum". www.visitnorway.com. Archived from the original on 2023-03-17. Retrieved 2023-03-17.