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Ermengarde-Blanche of Anjou

Countess consort of Gâtinais and later Duchess consort of Burgundy

Ermengarde-Blanche of Anjou[a] (c. 1018–1076), was a French noblewoman who was first Countess of Chateau-Landon and secondly Duchess of Burgundy. She is also called Hermangarde in some sources. Ermengarde-Blanch was the heiress of the countship of Anjou and is an ancestress of the House of Plantagenet.

Ermengarde of Anjou
Spouse(s) Geoffrey II, Count of Gâtinais
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy
Noble family House of Ingelger
Father Fulk III of Anjou
Mother Hildegarde of Sundgau
Born c. 1018
Angers
Died (1076-03-18)18 March 1076
Fleurey-sur-Ouche

LifeEdit

Ermengarde-Blanche was the daughter of Count Fulk III of Anjou and Hildegarde.[2] She was involved in two marriage alliances that greatly benefited her father and brother as counts of Anjou. She was first contracted to marry Geoffrey II, Count of Gâtinais, called Ferréol, who was also lord of Château-Landon.[3] It was important marriage to return Château-Landon to the counts of Anjou.[4] It took between twelve and eighteen months to arrange the marriage. Meanwhile Fulk paid a great deal of attention to Château-Landon.[4] He and his wife, Hildegarde, founded the abbey of Le Ronceray.[5] Originally a church dedicated to St. Mary, Hildegard was very active in its rebuilding into an abbey.[5] They gave the abbey many gifts including the forest of Lattay.[5] They gave more gifts to this abbey than any other church or religious house.[4] Her two sons of this marriage, Geoffrey III and Fulk both became counts of Anjou after her brother Geoffrey II Martel.[3] Among her descendants are the Plantagenet (or Angevin) kings of England.

After her husband Geoffrey died Ermengarde-Blanche married Robert I Capet, Duke of Burgundy.[6] Robert was the son of King Robert II of France.[6] Because both Ermengarde and her second husband Robert Capet were both descendants of Ingelger, they were related by blood.[7] This was found in charts prepared at the monastery of Saint-Aubin at Angers between 1048 and 1052. The ancestral charts show how closely the Angevin and Capet families were related.[7] The charts were probably created over concerns of who Ermengarde and Robert's daughter Hildegarde could or could not marry.[7] Ermengarde-Blanche died at Fleury-sur-Ouche on 18 March 1076.[2] Robert died three days later at the same place on 21 March 1076.[2]

FamilyEdit

Together she and Geoffrey II had the following children:

She married secondly Robert I, Duke of Burgundy.[8] Together they had a daughter:

NotesEdit

  1. Angevins were known to give daughters two names. Her aunt was Ermengarde-Gerberga.[1] There are several other examples in this family.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bernard Bachrach, 'Henry II and the Angevin Tradition', Albion, 16, 2, (1984), p. 117 n. 35
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln|Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 116
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 82
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Bernard S. Bachrach, Fulk Nerra, the Neo-Roman Consul, 987-1040 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993), p. 202
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Henk Teunis, The Appeal to the Original Status: Social Justice in Anjou in the Eleventh Century (Hilversum, Netherlands: Uitgeveri Verloren, 2006), p. 38
  6. 6.0 6.1 Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 11
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 The Haskins Society Journal: Studies in Medieval History 14, ed. Stephen Morillo (Woodbridge : Boydell, 2005), pp. 106-08
  8. 8.0 8.1 Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 20