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Kanpyō (era)

Japanese era

Kanpyō (寛平, Kanpyō, Kanbyō, Kanpei, Kanbei), also romanized as Kampyō was a Japanese era name (年号,, nengō,, lit. "year name") after Ninna and before Shōtai. This period started in April 889 and ended in April 898.[1] The reigning emperors were Uda-tennō (宇多天皇) and Daigo-tennō (醍醐天皇).[2]

Events of the Kanpyō eraEdit

  • 889 (Kanpyō 1, 10th month): Former-Emperor Yōzei suffered a period of acute mental illness.[3]
  • 4 August 897 (Kanpyō 9, 3rd day of the 7th month): In the 10th year of Uda's reign, the emperor abdicated; and his eldest son received the succession (senso).[4]
  • 6 August 897 (Kanpyō 9, 5th day of the 7th month): Emperor Daigo accepted the monarch's role and duties and powers (sokui).[5] This was confirmed in ceremonies.[6]

Related pagesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Louis-Frédéric (2005). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 465. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  2. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. pp. 125–129.
  3. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 127.
  4. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 129.
  5. Jien, Delmer Myers Brown, Ichirō Ishida (1979). 愚管抄: A Translation and Study of the Gukansho, an Interpretative History of Japan Written in 1219. University of California Press. p. 291. ISBN 978-0-520-03460-0.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  6. Varley, p. 44; a distinct act of senso is unrecognized prior to Emperor Tenji; and all sovereigns except Jitō, Yōzei, Go-Toba, and Fushimi have senso and sokui in the same year until the reign of Emperor Go-Murakami. Compare Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō), Ceremony of Accession (Sokui-no-Rei); retrieved 2012-2-26.

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Kanpyō 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898
Preceded by:
Ninna
Era or nengō:
Kanpyō
Succeeded by:
Shōtai