Otto Kerner, Jr.

33rd Governor of Illinois (1908-1976)

Otto Kerner, Jr. (August 15, 1908 – May 9, 1976) was an American politician. He was a Democrat. He was the Governor of Illinois from January 1961 to May 1968. He is best known for chairing the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders and for accepting bribes. He would later be charged with 17 charges of felony and would serve time in jail.[1] He was one of the four Governors of Illinois to be in jail. He would soon nominate Lyndon B. Johnson to be President.

Otto Kerner Jr.
Otto Kerner cropped.png
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
In office
April 22, 1968 – July 22, 1974
Appointed byLyndon B. Johnson
Preceded byWinfred George Knoch
Succeeded byWilliam Joseph Bauer
33rd Governor of Illinois
In office
January 9, 1961 – May 21, 1968
LieutenantSamuel H. Shapiro
Preceded byWilliam Stratton
Succeeded bySamuel H. Shapiro
Personal details
Born(1908-08-15)August 15, 1908
Chicago, Illinois
DiedMay 9, 1976(1976-05-09) (aged 67)
Chicago, Illinois
Resting placeArlington National Cemetery Arlington, Virginia
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Helena Cermak
Military service
Allegiance United States
 Illinois
 United States Army
Branch/serviceUnited States Army
Illinois Army National Guard
Years of service1934–1954
RankLieutenant Colonel (Army)
Major General (National Guard)
Unit33rd Infantry Division
Battles/warsWorld War II

Kerner was born on August 15, 1908 in Chicago, Illinois. His father was politician Otto Kerner, Sr.. Kerner studied at the Trinity College and at Brown University. He was married to Helena Cermak, the daughter of ex-Chicago mayor Anton Cermak who was assassinated. After leaving office, Kerner had suffered cancer and would later die from the disease on May 9, 1976 in Chicago, Illinois, aged 67. He was buried at the Arlington National Cemetery.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Frum, David (2000). How We Got Here: The '70s. New York, New York: Basic Books. p. 29. ISBN 0-465-04195-7.

Other websitesEdit