Multi-party system

system in which multiple political parties across the political spectrum run for national election, and all have the capacity to gain control of government offices, separately or in coalition

A multi-party system is a system where multiple political parties take part in national elections. Each party has its own views. A lot of countries that use this system have a coalition government[1], meaning many parties are in control, and they all work together to make laws. Good examples of countries that have this system include Brazil, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Taiwan, Philippines, and South Korea. There is no limit to the number of parties that can take part in a British election, but the government must command a majority in the House of Commons, and is usually formed from one party.

ReferencesEdit

  1. [1] - Education 2020, definition of multiparty: "A system in which several major and many lesser parties exist, seriously compete for, and actually win public offices."