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UEFA Euro 2000

2000 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 2000 UEFA European Football Championship, or Euro 2000, was the 11th UEFA European Football Championship. The championship is held every four years and organized by UEFA. UEFA is association football's governing body in Europe.

UEFA Euro 2000
UEFA Europees Voetbalkampioenschap
België/Nederland 2000 (Dutch)
UEFA Championnat Européen du Football
Belgique/Pays Bas 2000 (French)
UEFA Fußball-Europameisterschaft
Belgien/Niederlande 2000 (German)
Tournament details
Host countriesBelgium
Netherlands
Dates10 June – 2 July
Teams16
Venue(s)8 (in 8 host cities)
Final positions
Champions France (2nd title)
Runners-up Italy
Tournament statistics
Matches played31
Goals scored85 (2.74 per match)
Attendance1,122,833 (36,220 per match)
Top scorer(s)Netherlands Patrick Kluivert
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Savo Milošević
(5 goals)
Best playerFrance Zinedine Zidane
1996
2004

The finals of Euro 2000 were co-hosted (the first time this happened) by Belgium and the Netherlands, between 10 June and 2 July 2000. Spain and Austria also bid to host the event.[1] The final tournament had 16 nations. Except for Belgium and the Netherlands, the finalists had to go through a qualifying round to reach the final stage. France won the tournament. They defeated Italy 2–1 in the final, by a golden goal.

The finals were in the King Baudouin Stadium.

Qualified teamsEdit

The following 16 teams were in the tournament:

Country Qualified as Date of qualification Previous appearances in tournament1, 2
  Belgium 00Co-hosts 18 January 1998 3 (1972, 1980, 1984)
  Netherlands 01Co-hosts 18 January 1998 5 (1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996)
  Italy 02Group 1 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1968, 1980, 1988, 1996)
  Norway 03Group 2 winner 9 October 1999 0 (debut)
  Germany 04Group 3 winner 9 October 1999 7 (1972,4 1976,4 1980,4 1984,4 1988,4 1992, 1996)
  France 05Group 4 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1960, 1984, 1992, 1996)
  Sweden 06Group 5 winner 9 October 1999 1 (1992)
  Spain 07Group 6 winner 10 October 1999 5 (1964, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1996)
  Romania 08Group 7 winner 9 October 1999 1 (1996)
  Yugoslavia 10Group 8 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1960, 1968, 1976, 1984, 19925)
  Czech Republic 11Group 9 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1960,3 1976,3 1980,3 1996)
  Portugal 12Best runner-up 9 October 1999 2 (1984, 1996)
  Denmark 13Play-offs 17 November 1999 5 (1964, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996)
  England 14Play-offs 17 November 1999 5 (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996)
  Slovenia 15Play-offs 17 November 1999 0 (debut)
  Turkey 16Play-offs 17 November 1999 1 (1996)
1 Bold indicates champion for that year
2 Italic indicates host for that year
5 Did not qualify but replaced Yugoslavia, who were under sanctions by the UN Security Council Resolution 757 and banned from appearing.[2] Denmark were group 4 runners-up.

Final rankingsEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1   France 6 5 0 1 13 7 +6 15
2   Italy 6 4 1 1 9 4 +5 13
Eliminated in the Semi-finals
3   Netherlands 5 4 1 0 13 3 +10 13
4   Portugal 5 4 0 1 10 4 +6 12
Eliminated in the Quarter-finals
5   Spain 4 2 0 2 7 7 0 6
6   Turkey 4 1 3 0 3 4 -1 4
7   Romania 4 2 0 2 4 6 -2 4
8   Yugoslavia 4 1 1 2 8 13 –5 4
Eliminated in the Group stage
9   Czech Republic 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
10   Norway 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
11   England 3 1 1 1 5 6 –1 4
12   Belgium 3 1 1 1 2 5 –3 4
13   Slovenia 3 0 2 1 4 5 –1 2
14   Sweden 3 0 1 2 2 4 –2 1
15   Germany 3 0 1 2 1 5 –4 1
16   Denmark 3 0 0 3 0 8 –8 0
  • Rankings are based on performance, not team skill. Also, these rankings are unofficial and are not based on head-to-head record.
  • GoalscorersEdit

    4 goals
    3 goals
    2 goals
    1 goal
    Own goal

    AwardsEdit

    MascotEdit

    The mascot for the tournament was Benelucky. The name is a pun on Benelux. He is a lion-devil with hair colour a combination of the flag colours of both host nations. The lion is the national football emblem of the Netherlands and a devil is for Belgium, the team being nicknamed "the Red Devils".[3]

    ReferencesEdit

    1. Dietrich Schulze-Marmeling: Die Geschichte der Fußball-Europameisterschaft, Verlag Die Werkstatt, ISBN 978-3-89533-553-2
    2. "United Nations Security Council Resolution 757 (Implementing Trade Embargo on Yugoslavia)". United Nations. University of Minnesota Human Rights Center. 30 May 1992. Retrieved 18 August 2008.
    3. Kell, Tom (6 December 2010). "Euro 2012 mascots have big shoes to fill". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 9 July 2012.