Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

Sixth President of Iran

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, also written Ahmadinezhad (Persian: محمود احمدی‌نژاد‎; born October 28, 1956) is an Iranian politician who was the sixth President of the Islamic Republic of Iran. He was president from August 3, 2005 to August 3, 2013.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad 2019 02.jpg
Ahmadinejad in March 2019
6th President of Iran
In office
3 August 2005 – 3 August 2013
Supreme LeaderAli Khamenei
First Vice PresidentParviz Davoodi
Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei
Mohammad Reza Rahimi
Preceded byMohammad Khatami
Succeeded byHassan Rouhani
Mayor of Tehran
In office
3 May 2003 – 28 June 2005
Preceded byMohammad-Hossein Moghimi (Acting)
Succeeded byAli Saeedlou (Acting)
Governor of Ardabil Province
In office
28 November 1993 – 29 October 1997
PresidentAkbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
Preceded byProvince created
Succeeded bySeyyed Hamid Tahayi
Secretary General of the Non-Aligned Movement
In office
30 August 2012 – 3 August 2013
Preceded byMohamed Morsi
Succeeded byHassan Rouhani
Acting ministerial offices
Minister of Petroleum
Acting[1]
In office
16 May 2011 – 2 June 2011
PresidentHimself
Preceded byMasoud Mir-Kazemi
Succeeded byMohammad Aliabadi (Acting)
Minister of Intelligence
Acting[2]
In office
26 July 2009 – 5 August 2009
PresidentHimself
Preceded byGholam-Hossein Eje'i
Succeeded byHeydar Moslehi
Personal details
Born
Mahmoud Sabbaghian[3]

(1956-10-28) 28 October 1956 (age 63)
Aradan, Semnan, Imperial State of Iran
Political party
Spouse(s)Azam Farahi (1980–present)
Children3
Relatives
ResidenceSquare 72, Narmak, Tehran, Iran[4]
Alma materIran University of Science and Technology
OccupationUniversity professor
ProfessionTraffic engineer
SignatureSignature of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
WebsitePersonal Twitter
Military service
AllegianceIran Iran
Branch/serviceRevolutionary Guards
Years of service1986–1988[5][6]
RankNone[a]
UnitHamzeh Headquarters[5]
CommandsCombat engineering Unit, 6th Special Division[6]
Battles/warsIran–Iraq War

Ahmadinejad became the mayor of Tehran, the capital of Iran, on May 3, 2003. He was chosen to be the president in elections on June 24, 2005. Many people think he is very religious. Because of that, the religious leadership in Iran supported him in many ways when he was elected.

Ahmadinajad's political power comes from the Alliance of Builders of Islamic Iran, also known as "Abadgaran". This is an alliance between Islamic parties and organizations.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has a Master of Science in Civil engineering from the Iran University of Science and Techology. He also has a PhD in transportation engineering from the same university. Hassan Rouhani was elected on June 15, 2013 as Ahmadinejad's successor and took office on August 3, 2013.

His brother was failed presidential candidate and staff member Davoud Ahmadinejad (1950–2017).

ReferencesEdit

  1. Smith, Matt (16 May 2011). "Ahmadinejad losing ground in Iran power struggle, analysts say". CNN. Retrieved 3 June 2016.
  2. Milani, Abbas (3 August 2009). "Inside The Civil War That's Threatening The Iranian Regime". The New Republic. Retrieved 3 June 2016.
  3. داستان داوود و محمود: داوود احمدی‌نژاد چرا عليه محمود احمدی‌نژاد سخنرانی می‌كند؟ [The Story of Davoud and Mahmoud: Why Davoud Ahmadinejad Speaks Against Mahmoud Ahmadinejad?]. Aseman Weekly (in Persian) (7). 19 November 2011. Archived from the original on 20 August 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2016.
  4. Lucas, Scott (5 January 2015). "Iran Feature: Signs of an Ahmadinejad Comeback & a Hard-Line Challenge to Speaker of Parliament Larijani". EA WorldView. Retrieved 3 June 2016.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Peterson, Scott (2010). Let the Swords Encircle Me: Iran: A Journey Behind the Headlines. Simon and Schuster. pp. 279–280. ISBN 978-1416597391.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ehteshami, Anoushiravan; Zweiri, Mahjoob (2007), Iran and the Rise of Its Neoconservatives: The Politics of Tehran's Silent Revolution, I.B.Tauris, p. 55, ISBN 978-0857713674
  7. Afshon Ostovar (2016). Vanguard of the Imam: Religion, Politics, and Iran's Revolutionary Guards. Oxford University Press. p. 124. ISBN 978-0190491703.

Notes

  1. At the time, Revolutionary Guards rejected official ranks for its members and commanders were simply referred to with honorifics such as "brother" or "pasdar" (guard).[7]