Muslims

adherents of the religion of Islam
(Redirected from Muslim)

A Muslim is a person who believes in Islam, an Abrahamic monotheistic religion. Islam is a monotheistic religion from Abrahamic beginnings. Muslims believe the Qur'an is a book of the words that the God of Abraham (or Allah) gave to the Prophet Muhammad. Alongside the Qur'an, Muslims also believe in previous revelations of God, such as the Tawrat (Torah), the Zabur (Psalms), the Injeel (Gospel), the Scrolls of Abraham, and the Scrolls of Moses. Muslims believe human beings will be judged for how they lived on the Day of Judgement by Allah. Muslim men are usually circumcised.[28]

Muslims
Muslims praying in 1865 Cairo by Jean-Léon Gérôme
Total population
c.2 billion worldwide (2020)[1][2]
Founder
Muhammad[3]
Regions with significant populations
 Indonesia231,070,000[4]
 Pakistan213,161,100[5] [6]
 India207,000,000[7] [8]
 Bangladesh153,700,000[9][10] [11]
 Nigeria99,100,000[12]
 Egypt95,000,000[13]
 Iran82,900,000[14]
 Turkey82,800,000[15]
 China60,000,000—80,000,000[16][17]
 Algeria42,000,000[18]
Religions
80–90% Sunni Islam
12–17% Shia Islam
~1% Ahmadiyya
~1% Other Muslim traditions, e.g. Ibadi Islam[19]
Scriptures
Quran[20]
Languages
Arabic (also liturgical), Urdu, Bengali, Malay, Persian, Javanese, Punjabi, Turkish, Hausa, Mandarin Chinese & other Sinitic languages and languages of the Muslim world[21][22][23][24][25][26][27]

Muslims around the World change

Muhammad united Arabia into a single Muslim polity, with the Qur'an forming the basis of Islamic religious belief. Muslim conquests following Muhammad's death led to the creation of the Arab caliphates, occupying a vast geographical area. The Islamic conquests culminated in the Arab Empire being established across three continents (Asia, Africa, and Europe). Today, there are about 1.57 billion Muslims in the world, which is about 1 person in every 4 people. The Muslim population continues to grow.

References change

  1. "Muslim Population By Country 2021". World Population Review. Retrieved 22 July 2021.
  2. Lipka, Michael, and Conrad Hackett. [2015] 6 April 2017. "Why Muslims are the world’s fastest-growing religious group" (data analysis). Fact Tank. US: Pew Research Center.
  3. Welch, Alford T, Moussalli, Ahmad S, Newby, Gordon D (2009). "Muḥammad". In John L. Esposito (ed.). The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World. Oxford: Oxford University Press. The Prophet of Islam was a religious, political, and social reformer who gave rise to one of the great civilizations of the world. From a modern, historical perspective, Muḥammad was the founder of Islam. From the perspective of the Islamic faith, he was God's Messenger (rasūl Allāh), called to be a "warner," first to the Arabs and then to all humankind.
  4. "The World Factbook — Central Intelligence Agency". www.cia.gov. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  5. "SALIENT FEATURES OF FINAL RESULTS" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-08-29. Retrieved 2021-09-10.
  6. "Pakistan Population (2020) - Worldometer". www.worldometers.info. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  7. "Muslim Population in India - Muslims in Indian States". www.indiaonlinepages.com. Archived from the original on 8 September 2017. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  8. "India's religions by numbers". The Hindu. 26 August 2015 – via www.thehindu.com.
  9. "South Asia :: Bangladesh — The World Factbook – Central Intelligence Agency". cia.gov. Retrieved 14 December 2018.
  10. "BANGLADESH 2015 INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM REPORT" (PDF).
  11. "The Future of the Global Muslim Population". Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project. 15 January 2011. Archived from the original on 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  12. "The World Factbook". Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  13. "The World Factbook". Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  14. "The World Factbook". Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  15. "The World Factbook". Archived from the original on 10 January 2021. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  16. Gorder, A. Christian van (2014-05-29). Islam, Peace and Social Justice: A Christian Perspective. ISD LLC. ISBN 978-0-227-90200-4.
  17. "China (Includes Tibet, Hong Kong, Macau)". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2020-04-28.
  18. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. "Refworld - 2010 Report on International Religious Freedom - China (includes Tibet, Hong Kong, Macau)". Refworld. Archived from the original on 17 October 2012. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
  19. "Chapter 1: Religious Affiliation". The World’s Muslims: Unity and Diversity. Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project. 9 August 2012. Archived from the original on 26 December 2016. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  20. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein (2007). "Qurʼān". Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Archived from the original on 16 October 2007. Retrieved 4 November 2007.
  21. Khan, Muhammad Mojlum (2013). The Muslim Heritage of Bengal: The Lives, Thoughts and Achievements of Great Muslim Scholars, Writers and Reformers of Bangladesh and West Bengal. England: Kube Publishing. p. 2. Bengali-speaking Muslims... one of the largest linguistic groups... second only to the Arabs
  22. Talbot & Singh 2009, p. 27, footnote 3.
  23. Grim, Brian J.; Johnson, Todd M. (2013). Chapter 1: Global Religious Populations, 1910–2010 (PDF) (Report). Wiley. p. 22. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  24. "What are the top 200 most spoken languages?". Ethnologue. 2018-10-03. Retrieved 2019-12-07.
  25. Al-Jallad, Ahmad (30 May 2011). "Polygenesis in the Arabic Dialects". Archived from the original on 15 August 2016.
  26. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. "Refworld – 2010 Report on International Religious Freedom – China (includes Tibet, Hong Kong, Macau)". Refworld. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
  27. Nationalencyklopedin "Världens 100 största språk 2007" (The World's 100 Largest Languages in 2007), SIL Ethnologue
  28. "BBC - Religions - Islam: Circumcision of boys".

Other websites change