2006 Pacific hurricane season

Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean in 2006

The 2006 Pacific hurricane season was an above normal hurricane season with 19 named storms of 11 which were hurricanes and 6 were major hurricanes it was the most active season since 2000 Pacific hurricane season It officially began May 15, 2006 in the eastern Pacific, designated as the area east of 140°W, and began on June 1 2006 in the central Pacific, which is between the International Date Line and 140°W. Both seasons officially ended on November 30, 2006. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin.

2006 Pacific hurricane season
Season summary map
First storm formed May 27, 2006
Last storm dissipated November 20, 2006
Strongest storm Ioke – 915 mbar (hPa) (27.03 inHg), 160 mph (260 km/h)
Total storms 18 – East
1 – Central
Major hurricanes (Cat. 3+) 5 – East
1 – Central
Total fatalities 15
Total damage $170.8 million (2006 USD)
Pacific hurricane seasons
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

StormsEdit

Tropical Storm AlettaEdit

Tropical storm
DurationMay 27 – May 30
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1002 mbar (hPa)

On May 27 Tropical Depression One-E formed. It became Tropical Storm Aletta later on. Aletta stalled offshore Mexico causing minor damage. Tropical Storm Aletta weakened to a tropical depression and died on May 30.[1]

Tropical Depression Two-EEdit

Tropical depression
DurationJune 3 – June 5
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)

Two-E formed off shore Mexico on June 3. It died 2 days later. Two-E produced 15 inches of rain in Mexico before it died.[2]

Hurricane BudEdit

Category 3 hurricane
DurationJuly 11 – July 16
Peak intensity125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)  953 mbar (hPa)

Bud was a Category 3 storm. It rapidly strengthened and then weakened just as fast.

Hurricane CarlotaEdit

Category 1 hurricane
DurationJuly 12 – July 16
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  981 mbar (hPa)

Carlota caused light rain in Mexico but no damage was reported. It was a Category 1 storm.

Hurricane DanielEdit

Category 4 hurricane
DurationJuly 16 – July 26
Peak intensity150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  933 mbar (hPa)
 
Satellite Loop of Hurricane Daniel near peak intensity

Daniel was a long lived Major hurricane that Affected Hawaii with some rain. It peaked as a Category 4. It was the second strongest storm this year.

Tropical Storm EmiliaEdit

Tropical storm
DurationJuly 21 – July 28
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

It caused some rain in Mexico, causing minor damage.

Tropical Storm FabioEdit

Tropical storm
DurationJuly 31 – August 3
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Fabio caused heavy rainfall in Hawaii.

Tropical Storm GilmaEdit

Tropical storm
DurationAugust 1 – August 3
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

Gilma produced light rain in Mexico. It was also the weakest storm so far.

Hurricane HectorEdit

Category 2 hurricane
DurationAugust 15 – August 23
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  966 mbar (hPa)

Hector was a Category 2 hurricane. It made it to the Central Pacific.

Hurricane IokeEdit

Category 5 hurricane
DurationAugust 20 – August 27
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  915 mbar (hPa)

Ioke was the strongest hurricane ever in the Central Pacific that threated the Johnson Atoll and Wake Island. It formed on august 20. Ioke rapidly became a major hurricane 36 hours later. Ioke went extratropical on September 6. Damage was nearly $100 million. Ioke was retired at the end of the year. It also caused heavy rain in Alaska. Ioke is the most intense storm ever in the central Pacific and the only Category 5 storm that formed in the basin.

Hurricane IllenaEdit

Category 3 hurricane
DurationAugust 21 – August 27
Peak intensity120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  955 mbar (hPa)

Illena killed one person in Mexico. It peaked as a Cateogory 3 storm.

Hurricane JohnEdit

Category 4 hurricane
DurationAugust 28 – September 4
Peak intensity135 mph (215 km/h) (1-min)  948 mbar (hPa)

John started as Tropical Depression Eleven-E and later on became a tropical storm and then a hurricane. The hurricane peaked as a Category 4. John killed 5 when it hit Baja California as a Category 2 storm on September 1. Hurricane John died on September 4.[3]

Hurricane KristyEdit

Category 1 hurricane
DurationAugust 30 – September 8
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

Kristy was a Category 1 hurricane that was outflowed by Hurricane John.

Hurricane LaneEdit

Category 3 hurricane
DurationSeptember 13 – September 17
Peak intensity125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)  952 mbar (hPa)

Lane caused severe damage in Mexico, when it hit there as a Category 3 major hurricane. Lane killed 4 people and left $203 million in damage.

Tropical Storm MiriamEdit

Tropical storm
DurationSeptember 16 – September 18
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  999 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Depression Two-CEdit

Tropical depression
DurationSeptember 18 – September 20
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Depression Three-CEdit

Tropical depression
DurationSeptember 26 – September 27
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

Three-C was a short lived tropical depression that started several hundred miles southwest of Hawaii. It died the next day while no where near any land.[4]

Tropical Storm NormanEdit

Tropical storm
DurationOctober 9 – October 15
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Norman struck Mexico as a tropical depression, causing minor damage.

Tropical Storm OliviaEdit

Tropical storm
DurationOctober 9 – October 12
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

Olivia did not affect land.

Tropical Depression Four-CEdit

Tropical depression
DurationOctober 13 – October 14
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

Four-C was a short lived tropical depression. It formed on October 13 and died the next day. The remaims of Four-C caused heavy rain in Hawaii.

Hurricane PaulEdit

Category 2 hurricane
DurationOctober 21 – October 26
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  970 mbar (hPa)

Paul was a Cateogory 2 hurricane that killed 4 in Mexico.

Tropical Depression Eighteen-EEdit

Tropical depression
DurationOctober 26 – October 27
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Storm RosaEdit

Tropical storm
DurationNovember 8 – November 10
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1002 mbar (hPa)

Rosa produced light rain to Mexico in November.

Tropical Depression Twenty-EEdit

Tropical depression
DurationNovember 11 – November 11
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Depression Twenty-E formed and died on the same day, November 11. Twenty-E did not affect any land.[5]

Hurricane SergioEdit

Category 2 hurricane
DurationNovember 13 – November 20
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  965 mbar (hPa)

Sergio was also a Cateogory 2 storm. It was also the strongest November storm.

Storm namesEdit

Template:Tropical cyclone naming The following names were used for named storms that formed in the northeast Pacific in 2006.[6] This is the same list that was used in the 2000 season. There were no names retired from the northeast Pacific list. Therefore, the same list was reused in the 2012 season.

  • Rosa
  • Sergio
  • Tara (unused)
  • Vicente (unused)
  • Willa (unused)
  • Xavier (unused)
  • Yolanda (unused)
  • Zeke (unused)

For storms that form in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility, encompassing the area between 140 degrees west and the International Date Line, all names are used in a series of four rotating lists. The next four names that were slated for use in 2006 are shown below, however only the name Ioke was used.

  • Kika (unused)
  • Lana (unused)
  • Maka (unused)

RetirementEdit

The name Ioke was retired from the north-central Pacific list by the World Meteorological Organization in the spring of 2007 and replaced with Iopa.[7] During the 61st Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference, the Hawaii State Civil Defense requested the retirement of the name Daniel, citing that the storm had become memorable due to threat of damage.[8] However, the request was denied, as the name remains on the tropical cyclone naming list.[6]


Season effectsEdit

This is a table of all the storms that formed in the 2006 Pacific hurricane season. It includes their duration, names, landfall(s), denoted in parentheses, damages, and death totals. Deaths in parentheses are additional and indirect (an example of an indirect death would be a traffic accident), but were still related to that storm. Damage and deaths include totals while the storm was extratropical, a wave, or a low, and all the damage figures are in 2006 USD.

Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale
TD TS C1 C2 C3 C4 C5
2006 Pacific hurricane season statistics
Storm
name
Dates active Storm category

at peak intensity

Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs


Aletta May 27 – 30 Tropical storm 45 (75) 1002 None Minimal None
Two-E June 3 – 5 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1005 Southwestern Mexico, Western Mexico None None
Bud July 11 – 16 Category 3 hurricane 125 (205) 953 Hawaii None None
Carlotta July 12 – 16 Category 1 hurricane 85 (140) 981 None None None
Daniel July 16 – 26 Category 4 hurricane 150 (240) 933 Hawaii None None
Emilia July 21 – 28 Tropical storm 65 (100) 990 Southwestern Mexico, Western Mexico, Baja California Peninsula, Southwestern United States Minimal None
Fabio July 31 – August 3 Tropical storm 50 (85) 1000 None None None
Gilma August 1 – 3 Tropical storm 40 (65) 1004 None None None
Hector August 15 – 23 Category 2 hurricane 110 (175) 966 None None None
Ioke August 20 – 27,[nb 1] Category 5 hurricane 160 (260) 915 Johnston Atoll, Wake Island, Minamitorishima, Southern Alaska $88 million None
Ileana August 21 – 27 Category 3 hurricane 125 (205) 951 Socorro Island Minimal 1
John August 28 – September 4 Category 4 hurricane 130 (215) 948 Guerrero, Michoacán, Baja California Sur, Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas $60.9 million 5
Kristy August 30 – September 8 Category 1 hurricane 80 (130) 985 None None None
Lane September 13 – 17 Category 3 hurricane 125 (205) 952 Southwestern Mexico, Western Mexico, Northwestern Mexico, Southwestern United States $203 million 4
Miriam September 16 – 18 Tropical storm 45 (75) 999 None None None
Two-C September 19 – 20 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1007 None None None
Three-C September 26 – 27 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1008 None None None
Norman October 9 – 15 Tropical storm 50 (85) 1000 Southwestern Mexico,[nb 2] Western Mexico None None
Olivia October 9 – 12 Tropical storm 45 (75) 1000 None None None
Four-C October 13 – 14 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1007 None None None
Paul October 21 – 26 Category 2 hurricane 105 (165) 970 Oaxaca, Guerrero, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa $3.2 million 4
Eighteen-E October 26 – 27 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1007 None None None
Rosa November 8 – 10 Tropical storm 40 (65) 1002 None None None
Twenty-E November 11 Tropical depression 35 (55) 1007 None None None
Sergio November 13 – 20 Category 2 hurricane 110 (175) 965 Guerrero None None
Season Aggregates
25 systems May 27 – November 20   160 (260) 915 $355 million 14  

Related pagesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Though Hurricane Ioke did not make landfall, its strike on Wake Island is included in the table, due to the severe damage on the island.
  2. In its report on Tropical Storm Norman, the National Hurricane Center did not specify whether the storm moved ashore or not. However, in its report to the World Meteorological Organization, officials from Mexico included Norman in the storms that moved ashore along the country.

ReferencesEdit

  1. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-EP012006_Aletta.pdf
  2. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-EP022006_Two-E.pdf
  3. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-EP112006_John.pdf
  4. US Department of Commerce, NOAA. "2006 Tropical Cyclones Central North Pacific". www.prh.noaa.gov. Archived from the original on 2019-01-10. Retrieved 2019-02-11.
  5. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-EP202006_Twenty-E.pdf
  6. 6.0 6.1 National Hurricane Center (2008). "Worldwide Tropical Cyclone Names". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Archived from the original on September 8, 2010. Retrieved May 14, 2008.
  7. Dennis H. McCarthy (2007). "National Weather Service Instruction Tropical Cyclone Names and Pronunciation Guide" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on September 10, 2008. Retrieved December 29, 2007.
  8. Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference (2007). "The Nation's Hurricane Program: An Interagency Success Story" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 10, 2009. Retrieved December 29, 2007.

Other websitesEdit

Tropical cyclones of the 2006 Pacific hurricane season

Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale
TD TS C1 C2 C3 C4 C5
Note: Entries * refer to the Central Pacific System