Results of the 2016 Democratic Party presidential primaries

This article will show the current results of the Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2016. The Democratic Party presidential primary is a process of choosing delegates, or people that represent someone, to go to the 2016 Democratic National Convention. People in each state will vote on who they think will be good for the presidency, and each candidate gets a certain amount of delegates based on the number of votes they receive. The primaries began on 1 February 2016 in Iowa.[1] The remaining candidates are former first lady and secretary of state and senator Hillary Clinton and senator Bernie Sanders.

Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2016

← 2012 February 1 – June 14, 2016 2020 →

4,765 delegates to the Democratic National Convention
2,383 delegates votes needed to win
  Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg Bernie Sanders September 2015 cropped.jpg
Candidate Hillary Clinton Bernie Sanders
Home state New York Vermont
States carried 33 23

Democratic Party presidential primaries results, 2016.svg
First place (popular vote or delegate count)
     Hillary Clinton       Bernie Sanders


Nominee before election

Mitt Romney

Nominee

TBD


On June 6, 2016, the Associated Press reported that senator Hillary Clinton has gotten enough delegates to become the presumptive Democratic nominee.[2] However, their count includes some superdelegates. Since superdelegates can vote however they want at the Democratic convention, their votes could change at any time before then, so it is possible (but only remotely possible) that Clinton will not get the nomination. Bernie Sanders endorsed Clinton on 12 July 2016.[3]

Main candidatesEdit

Dropped out during primariesEdit

Dropped out before primariesEdit

ResultsEdit

 
Delegates
 
Popular vote
 
Delegate count
 
Counties won by the candidates.      Hillary Clinton      Bernie Sanders
 
How many delegates the candidates won in each state.      Hillary Clinton      Bernie Sanders
 
The pledged delegates gap.

All delegate total are approximate.[4]

Candidates  
Hillary Clinton
 
Bernie Sanders
 
Martin O'Malley
Pledged delegates 2,219 1,832 0
Unpledged delegates 581 49 1
Total delegates 2,800 1,881 1
Contests won 34 23 0
Results
Feb 1 Iowa 49.9%
(23 delegates)
49.6%
(21 delegates)
0.6%
(0 delegates)
Feb 9 New Hampshire 38.0%
(9 delegates)
60.4%
(15 delegates)
Feb 20 Nevada 52.6%
(20 delegates)
47.3%
(15 delegates)
Feb 27 South Carolina 73.5%
(39 delegates)
26.0%
(14 delegates)
Mar 1 Alabama 77.8%
(44 delegates)
19.2%
(9 delegates)
American Samoa 68.4%
(4 delegates)
25.7%
(2 delegates)
Arkansas 66.3%
(22 delegates)
29.7%
(10 delegates)
Colorado 40.4%
(28 delegates)
59.0%
(38 delegates)
Georgia 71.3%
(74 delegates)
28.2%
(28 delegates)
Massachusetts 50.1%
(46 delegates)
48.7%
(45 delegates)
Minnesota 38.3%
(31 delegates)
61.7%
(46 delegates)
Oklahoma 41.5%
(17 delegates)
51.9%
(21 delegates)
Tennessee 66.1%
(44 delegates)
32.4%
(23 delegates)
Texas 65.2%
(147 delegates)
33.2%
(75 delegates)
Vermont 13.6%
(0 delegates)
86.1%
(16 delegates)
Virginia 64.3%
(62 delegates)
35.2%
(33 delegates)
Mar 5 Kansas 32.3%
(9 delegates)
67.7%
(24 delegates)
Louisiana 71.1%
(37 delegates)
23.2%
(14 delegates)
Nebraska 42.9%
(10 delegates)
57.2%
(15 delegates)
Mar 6 Maine 35.5%
(9 delegates)
64.2%
(16 delegates)
Mar 1–8 Democrats Abroad 30.9%
(4 delegates)
68.9%
(9 delegates)
Mar 8 Michigan 48.2%
(63 delegates)
49.8%
(67 delegates)
Mississippi 82.6%
(32 delegates)
16.5%
(4 delegates)
Mar 12 Northern Marianas 54.0%
(4 delegates)
34.4%
(2 delegates)
Mar 15 Florida 64.4%
(142 delegates)
33.3%
(72 delegates)
Illinois 50.5%
(80 delegates)
48.7%
(76 delegates)
Missouri 49.6%
(36 delegates)
49.4%
(35 delegates)
North Carolina 54.6%
(60 delegates)
40.8%
(47 delegates)
Ohio 56.5%
(81 delegates)
42.7%
(62 delegates)
Mar 22 Arizona 57.6%
(44 delegates)
TBD
(30 delegates)
Idaho 21.2%
(5 delegates)
78.0%
(17 delegates)
Utah 20.3%
(6 delegates)
79.3%
(27 delegates)
Mar 26 Alaska 18.4%
(3 delegates)
81.6%
(13 delegates)
Hawaii 30.0%
(8 delegates)
69.8%
(17 delegates)
Washington 27.1%
(21 delegates)
72.7%
(68 delegates)
Apr 5 Wisconsin 43.1%
(38 delegates)
56.6%
(48 delegates)
Apr 9 Wyoming 44.3%
(7 delegates)
55.7%
(7 delegates)
Apr 19 New York 58.0%
(139 delegates)
42.0%
(108 delegates)
Apr 26 Connecticut 51.7%
(27 delegates)
46.5%
(24 delegates)
Delaware 59.8%
(12 delegates)
39.2%
(9 delegates)
Maryland 63.0%
(53 delegates)
33.3%
(24 delegates)
Pennsylvania 55.6%
(91 delegates)
43.6%
(59 delegates)
Rhode Island 43.3%
(11 delegates)
55.0%
(13 delegates)
May 3 Indiana 47.5%
(39 delegates)
52.5%
(44 delegates
May 7 Guam 59.5%
(4 delegates)
40.5%
(3 delegates)
May 10 West Virginia 36.1%
(9 delegates)
51.3%
(14 delegates)
May 17 Kentucky 46.8%
(28 delegates)
46.3%
(27 delegates)
Oregon 45.7%
(24 delegates)
54.3%
(28 delegates)
Jun 4 Virgin Islands 84.2%
(7 delegates)
12.2%
(0 delegates)
Jun 5 Puerto Rico 59.4%
(36 delegates)
37.5%
(24 delegates)
Jun 7 California 55.8%
(269 delegates)
43.2%
(206 delegates)
Montana 44.6%
(9 delegates)
51.0%
(10 delegates)
New Jersey 63.3%
(64 delegates)
36.7%
(41 delegates)
New Mexico 51.5%
(17 delegates)
48.5%
(14 delegates)
North Dakota 25.6%
(5 delegates)
64.2%
(13 delegates)
South Dakota 51.0%
(10 delegates)
49.0%
(10 delegates)
Jun 14 District of Columbia 78.7%
(16 delegates)
21.1%
(4 delegates)
  • The delegate count that is under the popular vote percentage is estimated. If you add all the delegates listed, you may get a result that is a little bit off from the total at the top of the table. It also only shows pledged delegates, and not super delegates.

Related pagesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. "Iowa caucuses: Ted Cruz wins; Clinton declares victory". CNN. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  2. "AP Count: Clinton has delegates to win Democratic nomination". 6 June 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  3. "Bernie Sanders endorses Hillary Clinton". CNN. Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  4. "Delegate tracker". The Associated Press Interactives.