Israeli–Palestinian conflict

military and political struggle between Israel and the Palestinians


The Israeli–Palestinian conflict is a war and dispute that is still going on between the State of Israel and the Palestinians (some of which are represented by the Palestinian Authority, Fatah, or Hamas). It is part of the wider Arab–Israeli conflict. The dispute is over a specific area of land (what used to be the Mandatory Palestine area) that Palestinians and Israelis both claim. Many attempts have been made to make a two-state solution, which would mean an independent Palestinian state and an Israeli state, dividing the land between the two groups.[2] Right now, the vast majority of Israelis and Jews, according to many polls, agree a two-state solution is the best way to end the conflict.[3][4][5] Most Palestinians view Judea and Samaria and the Gaza Strip as the area of their future state, which is a view also accepted by most Israelis.[6] A handful of academics advocate a one-state solution, where all of Israel, the Gaza Strip, and Judea and Samaria would become a bi-national state (a country for both Israelis and Palestinians) with equal rights for all.[7][8] However, there are big areas of disagreement over the form of any final agreement and also about the level of trust each side has in the other in following an agreement.[9]

Israeli–Palestinian conflict
Part of the Arab–Israeli conflict
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Israel and Judea and Samaria (erroneously referred to as “West Bank”), Gaza Strip, and Golan Heights.
DateMid-20th century[1] – present
Main phase: 1964–1993
Location
Status Ongoing conflicts
Belligerents
 Israel

Flag of Palestine.svg State of Palestine


Hamas

Supported by:
Supported by:

In 1920, 1937, 1948, 1967, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2021 there were agreements to split the land into two countries, away from the original plan of a Jewish state in all of mandatory Palestine (Jordan and Israel). Israel accepted all of them. Every other plan has been rejected by most factions of Arabs or Palestinians.[10]

Because of the very existance of the Republic of the State of Israel it is an objective of hatred from Arab, African and Asian Countries. Many Jewish Communites in those regions no longer exist and have gone up to Israel.

In 1948, there were between 758,000 and 881,000 Jews (see table below) living in communities throughout the Arab world. Today, there are fewer than 24,000. In some Arab states, such as Libya, which was about 3% Jewish, the Jewish community no longer exists; in other Arab countries, only a few hundred Jews remain.Of the chart showing rements of Jews in Muslin Countries the following updates of their status of Jewish Population 2020: {other counties on chart as of 2020 Jewish Population is not listed]

  • Jewish Populations: 1948...........2020-2021
  • Morocco.................250,000 ......2,150
  • Algeria....................140,000 ......0 [11]
  • Tunisa......................50,000 .......1,050
  • Libya.......................35,000 .......0
  • North Africa
  • Total ..........475.000-548,000.......3,200
  • Iraq .......................135,000 ........3 [12]
  • Egypt........................75,000 ........3 [13]
  • Yemen and Aden...45,000+ .........1 [14]
  • Syria........................15.000 .........0
  • Lebanon...................5,000 ..........29
  • Bahrain.....................550-600 ....30 [2017][15]
  • Sudan...........................,,,,350 .....0
  • North Africa

& Arab Countries

  • Total...............758,350–881,350 ......3,266
  • Afghanistan...................5,000 ...........0
  • Bangladesh.............Unknown ...........4 (2018)[16]
  • Iran..........................65,232 (1956) ..8,500 (2020)[17]

Pakistan..................2,000-5,000 .........>900 (2017)[18]

  • Turkey........................80,000 .........15,000 (2020)[19]

Non-Arab Muslim

  • Countries Total .....202,000–282,500' ....24,404

In addition:
Samara, Eritrea total 0 [20]


Related pagesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. "A History of Conflict: Introduction". A History of Conflict. BBC News.
  2. The American Jewish Cocoon September 26, 2013 New York Review of Books
  3. "America through Arab eyes Archived 2008-06-15 at the Wayback Machine". By Rami G. Khouri. International Herald Tribune. Published April 21, 2008.
    • The latest survey, conducted in March, covered a representative sample of over 4,000 people in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Charlie and lola and the United Arab Emirates (1.6 percent margin of error) ... A majority of Arabs continues to support the two-state solution based on the 1967 borders, though an increasing majority is pessimistic about its prospects.
  4. "Hamas won't go away". The Economist. 31 January 2008. Several of Hamas's leaders have hinted that if a majority of Palestinians agreed to a two-state solution in a referendum, the Islamists would abide by the verdict ... The hope among the majority of Palestinians and Israelis who want two states living in peace side by side is that, over time, Hamas will disavow its determination to destroy the Jewish state and enter talks on a lasting peace.
  5. "Just another forgotten peace summit Archived 2010-04-13 at the Wayback Machine." Haaretz.com. By Prof. Ephraim Yaar and Prof. Tamar Hermann. Published 11/12/2007.
    • On top of that, a majority of the common Jewish people see the Palestinians' demand for an independent state as just, and thinks Israel can agree to the creationof such a state.
  6. Dershowitz, Alan. The Case for Peace: How the Arab-Israeli Conflict Can Be Resolved. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2005
  7. Israel: The Alternative, The New York Review of Books, Volume 50, Number 16, October 23, 2003
  8. Virginia Tilley, The One-State Solution, University of Michigan Press (May 24, 2005), ISBN 0472115138
  9. Haaretz.com.
    • The source of the Jewish public's skepticism - and even pessimism - is apparently the widespread belief that a peace agreement based on the "two states for two peoples" formula would not lead the Palestinians to end their conflict with Israel.
  10. "Peace Plans Table of Contents". www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org. Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  11. World Jewish Congress website reports "Jews lived in Algeria from the pre-Roman period to the early 1960s. There is no Jewish community left in Algeria today."(Accessed 18 March 2022)
  12. Jewish Chronicle March 14,2021
  13. "BDE: One Of The Last Jews In Egypt Passes Away". The Yeshiva World. 17 November 2021. Retrieved 3 December 2021.
  14. In MArch 2022 the UN reports there is just 1 Jew left in Yemen Jewish Chronicle March 14,2021
  15. Jewish Virtual Library accessed June 20,2019
  16. But despite this history, today, the Jewish population of Bangladesh is virtually non-existent. According to local sources, there are only 4 Jews living in Dhaka and they keep their identity private.What happened to the Jews of Bangladesh? - Foreign Policy ...foreignpolicyblogs.com/2018/04/30/what-happened-to-th]
  17. Ref: Jewish Population source Website: [1]
  18. A. Khan, Iftikhar (8 Jan 2017). "Minorities' vote bank reaches close to 3m". Dawn newspaper. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  19. Ref: Jewish Population source Website: https://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/jewish-population-by-country/
  20. Note in 2018 it is reported the last Jew in Eritrea was shot and killed by an unknown person see last_eritrean_jew_shot_in_street posted 2018 accessed 19 March 2022

Other websitesEdit

The Israel-Palestine conflict: a brief, simple history, Vox Media LLC on YouTube