2024 Republican Party presidential primaries

ongoing electoral process in the United States

The 2024 Republican Party presidential primaries are elections in states that are organized by the Republican Party. They choose the delegates to the 2024 Republican National Convention. They happen between January and June 2024. The national convention chooses the party's nominee for president and vice president in the 2024 presidential election. The elections will take place in all 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories.

2024 Republican Party presidential primaries

← 2020 January 15 to June 11, 2024[1] 2028 →

2,429 delegates (2,272 pledged and 157 unpledged)
to the Republican National Convention[2][a]
1,215[2] votes needed to win
Opinion polls
 
Candidate Donald Trump Nikki Haley
Home state Florida South Carolina
Estimated delegate count 1,892[3] 96[3]
Contests won 42[b] 2[c]
Popular vote 14,128,984 3,937,184

Previous Republican nominee

Donald Trump

Presumptive Republican nominee

Donald Trump

Background

change

Former president Donald Trump announced he would run on November 15, 2022. Former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley became the first to follow his entrance on February 14, followed by wealth management executive Vivek Ramaswamy one week later, businessman Perry Johnson on March 2, former Arkansas governor Asa Hutchinson on April 6, radio host Larry Elder on April 20, U.S. Senator Tim Scott on May 19, Florida governor Ron DeSantis on May 24, former Vice President Mike Pence on June 5, former New Jersey governor Chris Christie on June 6, North Dakota governor Doug Burgum on June 7, Miami mayor Francis Suarez on June 14, and former U.S. Representative Will Hurd on June 22. Four frontrunners quickly emerged: DeSantis, Haley, Ramaswamy, and Trump. The remaining candidates failed to gain traction, leading most to drop out in the second half of 2023. Once the primaries began, the only candidates left in the race were the aforementioned four and Hutchinson.

Trump has been seen as the frontrunner and has had a steady lead in primary polling since 2020. Some Republicans have shown concerns about his nomination due to his loss in 2020, his own role in inciting the January 6 United States Capitol attack, his ongoing criminal investigations, and the results of the 2022 midterms

Trump is the first president to run after leaving office since Herbert Hoover in 1940. If he wins the Republican nomination, he will be the first Republican to be nominated for president three separate times since Richard Nixon (Republican nominee in 1960, 1968, and 1972), and the first person to be the Republican presidential nominee in three consecutive elections. If he wins the general election, he will be the first president to serve non-consecutive terms since Grover Cleveland, who won his second term in 1892.[6] Meanwhile, Pence's candidacy made him the first vice president to run against the president under whom they served since John Nance Garner in 1940.[7]

Primaries and caucuses results

change

At the January 15 Iowa caucuses, Trump posted a landslide victory, while DeSantis narrowly beat out Haley for second. Ramaswamy finished a distant fourth, while Hutchinson took sixth, behind businessman Ryan Binkley.[8] Owing to their poor showing, Ramaswamy and Hutchinson quickly dropped out of the race.[9][10] On February 24, Trump won the 2024 South Carolina Republican presidential primary.[11][12][13][14][15]

Candidates

change

Declared

change

The major candidates meet at least one of these criteria:

A. Significant media coverage B. Included in 5 different primary polls C. Participated in an RNC-sanctioned Presidential Debate D. Listed as a major candidate or included in polling averages by ABC News, FiveThirtyEight, CNN, The Trafalgar Group, or FOX News E. Earned a significant number of delegates F. Won a primary contest

Declared major candidates for the 2024 Republican Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
Announcement date
Ref.
 
Donald Trump
June 14, 1946
(age 78)
Queens, New York
President of the United States
(2017–2021)

Chairman of The Trump Organization
(1971–2017)
Florida[d]  
Campaign
November 15, 2022
FEC filing[16][17]
Website
[18]


Withdrew during the primaries

change

The candidate in this section have suspended their campaigns, or have otherwise ceased campaigning and ended their bids for the nomination during the primary season.

Withdrawn major candidates for the 2024 Republican Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Campaign Bound delegates Popular vote Ref.
 
Nikki Haley
January 20, 1972
(age 52)
Bamberg, South Carolina
Ambassador to the United Nations
(2017–2018)

Governor of South Carolina
(2011–2017)
South Carolina State Representative
(2005–2011)
 
South Carolina
February 14, 2023
March 6, 2024  

Campaign

FEC Filing[19]

Website

96 (4.8%) 3,937,184

(20.9%)

[20][21]
 
Ryan Binkley
November 19, 1967
(age 56)
Columbus, Georgia
Co-founder and CEO of Generational Equity Group
(2006–present)

Co-founder and lead pastor of Create Church
(2014–present)
 
Texas
April 23, 2023 February 27, 2024
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[22][23]
Website
0
(0.0%)
2,150
(0.2%)
[24][25]
 
Ron DeSantis
September 14, 1978
(age 45)
Jacksonville, Florida
Governor of Florida
(2019–present)

U.S. Representative from FL-06
(2013–2018)
 
Florida
May 24, 2023 January 21, 2024
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[26][27][28]
Website
9
(22.5%)
23,420
(21.2%)
[29][30]
 
Asa Hutchinson
December 3, 1950
(age 73)
Bentonville, Arkansas
Governor of Arkansas
(2015–2023)

Under Secretary of Homeland Security
(2003–2005)
Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration
(2001–2003)
 
Arkansas
April 26, 2023 January 16, 2024
(endorsed Haley)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[31]
Website
0
(0.0%)
191 (0.2%) [32][10]
 
Vivek Ramaswamy
August 9, 1985
(age 38)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Executive chairman of Strive Asset Management
(2022–2023)

CEO of Roivant Sciences
(2014–2021)
 
Ohio
February 21, 2023 January 15, 2024
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[33][34]
Website
3
(7.5%)
8,449 (7.7%) [35][36]

Withdrew before the primaries

change

The candidates in this section have suspended their campaigns, or have otherwise ceased campaigning and ended their bids for the nomination before any primary contests were held.

Withdrawn major candidates for the 2024 Republican Party presidential primaries
Name Born Experience Home state Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Campaign Ref.
 
Chris Christie
September 6, 1962
(age 61)
Newark, New Jersey
Governor of New Jersey
(2010–2018)

Candidate for president (2016)
U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey
(2002–2008)
 
New Jersey
June 6, 2023 January 10, 2024  
Campaign
FEC filing[37]
Website
[38][39]
 
Doug Burgum
August 1, 1956
(age 67)
Arthur, North Dakota
Governor of North Dakota
(2016–present)

Senior VP of Microsoft Business Solutions Group
(2002–2007)
President of Great Plains Software
(1984–2001)
 
North Dakota
June 7, 2023 December 4, 2023
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[40]
Website
[41][42]
 
Tim Scott
September 19, 1965
(age 58)
North Charleston, South Carolina
U.S. Senator from South Carolina
(2013–present)

U.S. Representative from SC-01
(2011–2013)
South Carolina State Representative
(2009–2011)
  South Carolina May 19, 2023
Exploratory committee:
April 12, 2023
November 12, 2023
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[43][44]
Website
[45][46]
 
Mike Pence
June 7, 1959
(age 64)
Columbus, Indiana
Vice President of the United States
(2017–2021)

Governor of Indiana
(2013–2017)
U.S. Representative from IN-06 (2003–2013)
U.S. Representative from IN-02 (2001–2003)
  Indiana June 5, 2023 October 28, 2023  
Campaign
FEC filing[47]
Website
[48][49]
 
Larry Elder
April 27, 1952
(age 71)
Los Angeles, California
Host of The Larry Elder Show
(1993–2022)

Candidate for Governor of California in the 2021 recall election
  California April 20, 2023 October 26, 2023
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[50]
Website
[51][52]
 
Perry Johnson
January 23, 1948
(age 75)
Dolton, Illinois
Founder of Perry Johnson Registrars, Inc.
(1994–present)

Disqualified candidate for Governor of Michigan in 2022
  Michigan March 2, 2023 October 20, 2023
(endorsed Trump)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[53]
Website
[54][55][56]
 
Corey Stapleton
September 17, 1967
(age 56)
Seattle, Washington
Montana Secretary of State
(2017–2021)

Montana State Senator
(2001–2009)
  Montana November 11, 2022
Exploratory committee:
March 10, 2022
October 13, 2023  
Campaign
FEC filing[57]
Website
[58][59][60]
 
Will Hurd
August 19, 1977
(age 46)
San Antonio, Texas
U.S. Representative from TX-23
(2015–2021)
  Texas June 22, 2023 October 9, 2023
(endorsed Haley)
 
Campaign
FEC filing[61]
Website
[62][63]
 
Francis Suarez
October 6, 1977
(age 45)
Miami, Florida
Mayor of Miami
(2017–present)

Member of the Miami City Commission (2009–2017)
  Florida June 14, 2023 August 29, 2023  
Campaign
FEC filing[64]
Website Archived 2023-08-22 at the Wayback Machine[e]
[65][66]


Other notable individuals who were not considered major candidates and who withdrew from the race before the beginning of the primary season include:


Declined to be candidates

change

The following notable individuals have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

  1. This delegate count is accurate as of January 2024. Delegate counts were subject to change based on the number of Republicans elected to the state legislatures, governorships, U.S. House, and U.S. Senate through December 31, 2023.
  2. The state-organized Michigan primary and the party-organized Michigan caucuses, both won by Trump, are counted as separate contest victories.[4]
  3. Haley also won the state-organized Nevada primary, though these results were ignored by the Republican Party in favor of a party-organized caucus.[5]
  4. Trump's original state of residence was New York, but that changed when he moved to Mar-a-Lago in 2019.
  5. Archived August 23, 2023, at the Wayback Machine

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