2018 United States elections

elections in the United States in 2018

The 2018 United States elections were held Tuesday, November 6, 2018.[c] These midterm elections happened during the presidency of Republican Donald Trump. Thirty-five of the 100 seats in the United States Senate and all 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives were in the elections. Thirty-nine state and territorial governorships as well as many state and local elections were also in the elections.

2018 United States elections
2017          2018          2019
Midterm elections
Election dayNovember 6
Incumbent presidentDonald Trump (Republican)
Next Congress116th
Senate elections
Overall controlRepublican hold
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(33 seats of Class I +2 special elections)
Net seat changeRepublican +2
2018 United States Senate special election in Minnesota2018 United States Senate special election in Mississippi2018 United States Senate election in Arizona2018 United States Senate election in California2018 United States Senate election in Connecticut2018 United States Senate election in Delaware2018 United States Senate election in Florida2018 United States Senate election in Hawaii2018 United States Senate election in Indiana2018 United States Senate election in Maine2018 United States Senate election in Maryland2018 United States Senate election in Massachusetts2018 United States Senate election in Michigan2018 United States Senate election in Minnesota2018 United States Senate election in Mississippi2018 United States Senate election in Missouri2018 United States Senate election in Montana2018 United States Senate election in Nebraska2018 United States Senate election in Nevada2018 United States Senate election in New Jersey2018 United States Senate election in New Mexico2018 United States Senate election in New York2018 United States Senate election in North Dakota2018 United States Senate election in Ohio2018 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2018 United States Senate election in Rhode Island2018 United States Senate election in Tennessee2018 United States Senate election in Texas2018 United States Senate election in Utah2018 United States Senate election in Vermont2018 United States Senate election in Virginia2018 United States Senate election in West Virginia2018 United States Senate election in Washington2018 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2018 United States Senate election in Wyoming2018 United States Senate elections results map.svg
About this image
2018 Senate results
(Minnesota and Mississippi each held two Senate elections)
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Independent hold
House elections
Overall controlDemocratic gain
Seats contestedAll 435 voting seats
+5 of 6 non-voting seats[a]
Popular vote marginDemocratic +8.6%
Net seat changeDemocratic +41
US House 2018.svg
2018 House of Representatives results
(territorial delegate races not shown)
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested39 (36 states, three territories)
Net seat changeDemocratic +7[b]
2018 Alabama gubernatorial election2018 Alaska gubernatorial election2018 Arizona gubernatorial election2018 Arkansas gubernatorial election2018 California gubernatorial election2018 Colorado gubernatorial election2018 Connecticut gubernatorial election2018 Washington, D.C. mayoral election2018 Florida gubernatorial election2018 Georgia gubernatorial election2018 Hawaii gubernatorial election2018 Idaho gubernatorial election2018 Illinois gubernatorial election2018 Iowa gubernatorial election2018 Kansas gubernatorial election2018 Maine gubernatorial election2018 Maryland gubernatorial election2018 Massachusetts gubernatorial election2018 Michigan gubernatorial election2018 Minnesota gubernatorial election2018 Nebraska gubernatorial election2018 Nevada gubernatorial electionNew Hampshire gubernatorial election, 20182018 New Mexico gubernatorial election2018 New York gubernatorial election2018 Ohio gubernatorial election2018 Oklahoma gubernatorial election2018 Oregon gubernatorial election2018 Pennsylvania gubernatorial election2018 Rhode Island gubernatorial election2018 South Carolina gubernatorial election2018 South Dakota gubernatorial election2018 Tennessee gubernatorial election2018 Texas gubernatorial election2018 Vermont gubernatorial election2018 Wisconsin gubernatorial election2018 Wyoming gubernatorial election2018 Guam gubernatorial election2018 Northern Mariana Islands gubernatorial election2018 United States Virgin Islands gubernatorial election2018 United States gubernatorial elections results map.svg
About this image
2018 gubernatorial election results
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Democratic gain      Republican gain

Democrats net gained of 41 seats in the United States House of Representatives,[d] gaining a majority in the chamber. This ended the control that the Republican Party had over the entire legislature. The Republican Party kept control of the United States Senate, making a net gain of two seats and defeating four Democratic incumbents in states that had voted for Trump in 2016. In the state elections, Democrats gained seven state governorships, control of at least 350 state legislative seats, and control of six state legislative chambers.

The elections had the highest voter turnout seen in midterm elections since 1914. This election was believed to be a "blue wave" election for the House and the states, but not the Senate.

TurnoutEdit

 
Turnout of the voting eligible population in midterm elections held since 1945

On November 6, the United States Election Project estimated that 40 million early voters cast ballots on November 6, breaking the record for the number of early votes.[1]

50.3 percent of eligible voters voted in 2018. In 2014, only 36.7 percent of eligible voters voted.[2] The 2018 elections had highest turnout of any mid-term election held since the 1914 elections.[3]

Results tableEdit

Subdivision and PVI Before 2018 elections[4] After 2018 elections[5][6]
Subdivision PVI[7] Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Alabama R+14 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–1 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–1
Alaska R+9 Ind Split Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Split Rep Rep 1–0
Arizona R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–4 Rep Rep Split Dem 5–4
Arkansas R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
California D+12 Dem Dem Dem Dem 39–14 Dem Dem Dem Dem 46–7
Colorado D+1 Dem Split Split Rep 4–3 Dem Dem Split Dem 4–3
Connecticut D+6 Dem Split Dem Dem 5–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0
Delaware D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0
Florida R+2 Rep Rep Split Rep 15–11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 14–13
Georgia R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 10–4 Rep Rep Rep Rep 9–5
Hawaii D+18 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
Idaho R+19 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0
Illinois D+7 Rep Dem Dem Dem 11–7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5
Indiana R+9 Rep Rep Split Rep 7–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2
Iowa R+3 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep Dem 3–1
Kansas R+13 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Kentucky R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–1
Louisiana R+11 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1
Maine D+3 Rep Split Split R/I[e] Split 1–1 Dem Dem Split R/I[e] Dem 2–0
Maryland D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1
Massachusetts D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0
Michigan D+1 Rep Rep Dem Rep 9–4 Dem Rep Dem Split 7–7
Minnesota D+1 Dem Rep Dem Dem 5–3 Dem Split Dem Dem 5–3
Mississippi R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Missouri R+9 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2
Montana R+11 Dem Rep Split Rep 1–0 Dem Rep Split Rep 1–0
Nebraska R+14 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0
Nevada D+1 Rep Dem Split Dem 3–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1
New Hampshire Even Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0 Rep Dem Dem Dem 2–0
New Jersey D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 11–1
New Mexico D+3 Rep Dem Dem Dem 2–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–0
New York D+11 Dem Split Dem Dem 17–9 Dem Dem Dem Dem 21–6
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 10–3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 9–3[f]
North Dakota R+17 Rep Rep Split Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Ohio R+3 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–1
Oregon D+5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1
Pennsylvania Even Dem Rep Split Rep 12–6 Dem Rep Split Split 9–9
Rhode Island D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–2
South Dakota R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2
Texas R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 25–11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 23–13
Utah R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Vermont D+15 Rep Dem Split D/I[g] Dem 1–0 Rep Dem Split D/I[g] Dem 1–0
Virginia D+1 Dem Rep Dem Rep 7–4 Dem Rep Dem Dem 7–4
Washington D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 6–4 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3
West Virginia R+20 Rep Rep Split Rep 2–0 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0
Wisconsin Even Rep Rep Split Rep 5–3 Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3
Wyoming R+25 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
United States Even Rep 33–16–1 Rep 31–13 Rep 51–49[h] Rep 235–193 Rep 27–23 Rep 30–18 Rep 53–47[h] Dem 235–199[f]
Washington, D.C. D+43 Dem[i] Dem[i] N/A Dem Dem Dem N/A Dem
American Samoa N/A NP/D[j] NP Rep NP/D[j] NP Rep
Guam Rep Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands Rep Rep Ind[k] Rep Rep Ind[k]
Puerto Rico PNP/D[l] PNP PNP/R[m] PNP/D[l] PNP PNP/R[m]
U.S. Virgin Islands Ind Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Subdivision and PVI Before 2018 elections After 2018 elections

Number of people who watched it on televisionEdit

NotesEdit

  1. One non-voting member of the House of Representatives, the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, serves a four-year term and was not up for election in 2018.
  2. Democrats won a net gain of seven state governorships. Additionally, the party picked up two territorial governorships.
  3. Some special elections as well as the regularly-scheduled elections in the Northern Mariana Islands were held on other dates.
  4. Democrats won a net gain of 40 seats on election day, but gained one more seat in a special election held earlier in 2018. One House seat in North Carolina continued to be empty after the elections due to allegations of election fraud; a special election filled it in 2019.
  5. 5.0 5.1 One of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, is a Republican. The other senator from Maine, Angus King, is an independent who has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Due to fraud allegations, the results for the North Carolina's 9th congressional district election were declared void, and the seat remained vacant at the start of the 116th United States Congress. A new special election will be held in 2019 to fill the seat.
  7. 7.0 7.1 One of Vermont's senators, Patrick Leahy, is a Democrat. The other senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders, was elected as an independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  8. 8.0 8.1 The Democratic Senate caucus consisted of 47 Democrats and 2 independents prior to the 2018 elections and 45 Democrats and two independents after the elections.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Washington, D.C. does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a city council.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lolo Matalasi Moliga has affiliated with the Democratic Party at the national level since re-election in 2016.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Delegate Gregorio Sablan was elected as an independent, but he has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2009.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Puerto Rican Governor Ricardo Rosselló was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and affiliates with the Democratic Party at the national level.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner, Jenniffer González, was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and has caucused with the Republicans since taking office in 2017.

ReferenceEdit

  1. Timmons, Heather (November 6, 2018). "Early voting breaks all previous records in the US's 2018 midterm elections—Quartz". qz.com. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  2. Sharma, Manas; Mellnik, Ted; Fischer-Baum, Reuben (December 31, 2018). "How did voter turnout in your county compare to the 2016 presidential election?". Washington Post.
  3. Aytaç, S. Erdem; Stokes, Susan (November 20, 2018). "Americans just set a turnout record for the midterms, voting at the highest rate since 1914. This explains why". Washington Post.
  4. "2017 State & Legislative Partisan Composition" (PDF). National Conference of State Legislatures. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  5. "2018 State & Legislative Partisan Composition" (PDF). NCSL. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  6. "2018 Midterm Election Results: Live". New York Times. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  7. Coleman, Miles. "2016 State PVI Changes". Decision Desk HQ. Archived from the original on October 14, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  8. "Fox News, CNN Split the 2018 Midterm Election Ratings Battle". Adweek. November 7, 2018.